{Contests} Win Lidia Bastianich’s Cookbooks!

“My grandmother, Nonna Rosa, was a small woman with lovely strong hands worn from working her garden. Before I was tall enough to reach the tabletop, she had me pulling up vegetables and cooking alongside her.” -FOF Lidia Bastianich, Wondertime.com

FOFs have the important responsibility of passing traditions from one generation to the next. Our fave FOF chef, Lidia Bastianich, took her own children to visit their great-grandmother ever other year in the Italian town of Busoler (now part of Croatia) to experience her incredible cooking.

She shares these dishes in her acclaimed cookbooks. Now one lucky FOF winner will have a chance to win four titles:

-Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy
-Lidia’s Family Table
Lidia’s Italy
-Lidia’s Italian-American Kitchen

(Contest ends Wednesday, August 18, 2010 at midnight E.S.T.)

Do you have a fail-proof cookbook? Tell us about it below to enter.

Thank you for entering. This contest is now closed.

198 Responses to “{Contests} Win Lidia Bastianich’s Cookbooks!”

  1. Connie says:

    Most ot the time I just cook based on past trail and error, but occasionally and when entertaining I use some tried and true cookbooks passed down from my mother and grandmother. I have recently passed many of these down to my daughter-in-law, who loves to cook and bake. My son loves to eat, so they are a great match!

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  2. Leslie Lundquist says:

    My go to book is the newest Gourmet Cookbook. If I need to make anything new for a meal it always has more than one recipe which I would choose for the event!

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  3. Nan says:

    “Joy of Cooking” will always be indispensible!

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  4. Diana Duda says:

    When a young bride there were three cookbooks that were my “go to” cookbooks….JOY OF COOKING, FARM JOURNAL’S COUNTRY COOKBOOK, and my faithful BETTY CROCKER’S COOKBOOK. This trio provided the basics that I needed as a new cook. They not only gave me recipes that were tried and true, they held lots of basic information.

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  5. Carol says:

    Fanny Farmers Cookbook. I love this book

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  6. Shelley Cochrane says:

    Mark Bittman “How to Cook Everything” and “How to Cook Everything Vegetarian” are great. He has a new cookbook coming out in September based on his recent book, “Food Matters, A Guide to Conscious Eating”. I hope everyone discovers this important and tasty cookbook.

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  7. Berta55 says:

    My go to is a quaint old stained cookbook published by Garden Clubs in Northeast Ohio. From banana bread to german chocolate cookies to zucchini casserole- it is all here! I have had this cookbook for my entire married life- over 34 years and I still use it just about every week. Married to a first generation Itallian I love watching Lidia- her recipes are quite similar to the way my in-laws cooked- one of the reasons I just had to marry into their fabulous family!

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  8. Marie Miller says:

    My old Better Homes & Gardens is falling apart, have had it since my wedding 41 years ago! I refer to it a couple of times a week. But what I would love is a collection of Italian cookbooks. My mother, Rose Damiano, was a wonderful cook, she learned everything from her mother and grandmother. Her recipes were never written down, and now that I am in my 60’s, with grandchildren, I want to pass my traditions and love of Italian cooking on to the next generation.

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  9. Debbi Herold says:

    Oh my….it’d be IMPOSSIBLE to have ONLY ONE FOOLPROOF Cookbook!!! Not only do I have a HUGE cookbook collection from at least 34 years of trials, errors, and successes, I have been collecting individual Chef’s recipes and write ups for at least that long. I know…it’s a sickness, but I love preserving special ideas and recipes. I have several file folders and 3-ring notebooks organized by categories ie. pork, chicken, lamb, cakes, salads…..and on and on.

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  10. Kristine P says:

    I love cookbooks, but find myself going to the Joy of Cooking

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  11. Paula says:

    I usually go to Betty Crocker, Joy of Cooking or Cooking Light. I also have some wonderful vegetarian books with lovely recipes. Have watched Lidia on PBS for a long while and love the family recipes and rituals she brings to the shows. I’d love to add her cookbook to my collection. Prego!

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  12. Susan Rousculp says:

    The Joy of Cooking is my go-to to begin with, I also love Great Good Food by Julie Russo.
    I would love to win these cookbooks. I’m a cook and a gardener.

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  13. Carol says:

    The joy of cooking, I still have my original edition from my bridal shower!

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  14. Linda says:

    Betty Crocker, I’ve had this book since my early 20’s. I enjoy the fact that it was my beginning cookbook, trusted and true!

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  15. Gail says:

    My go- to cookbook is “the Classic Italian Cookbook” by Marzella Hazan

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  16. donna jamison says:

    I still refer to the Fannie Farmer Cookbook that I used as a new bride in 1972.

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  17. Ivy says:

    A vast collection of recipe clippings I’ve been collecting for over 20 years. Some have been handed down from family.

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  18. jean says:

    i love all of the silver palate cookbooks they have unusual but relatively easy to follow recipes

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  19. maureen says:

    The Good Food cookbook by Jane Brody. So easy delicious and healthy

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  20. Sandy says:

    Better Homes and Gardens. had mine for 58 years and still using it.

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  21. nancy wolfe says:

    My mainstay is The Betty Crocker cookbook which I have used for years and now I purchased one for my daughter, too.
    I love to watch your show when I have time!

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  22. sue hieber says:

    my never fail cookbook is the recipes my grandmother taught me, it’s a virtual cookbook in my head.

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  23. Sue Manyai says:

    My favorite cookbook is the Hungarian Cookbook (Culinary Arts Institute) from the Advenures in Cooking series. It is ancient but foolproof and the Dobos Torta is as good as it can get.

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  24. ruth brasch says:

    I met Ms. Bastianich at a food fair in NYC when she was hosting an event. She was charming and even helped us move to get out of the sun.

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  25. sydney85 says:

    My favorite cookbooks are from William-Sonoma. I have found they have such a range of books in all categories that have really come to my rescue at times.

    masperle@austin.rr.com

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  26. sandy says:

    I love the famous Italian restaurant Carmines cookbook. Great pictures, great no-fail recipes

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  27. Starla says:

    I still go to my Betty Crocker cookbook but with the internet it’s so easy to find whatever I’m looking for.

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  28. Jan Zalobsky says:

    My favorite cookbook is any one by Jacques Pepin. He has great recipes, simple instructions, beautiful photographs and in some books, Chef Pepin’s own illustrations. He has a book he did with his daughter that my own daughters have used cooking with their dad as well as myself. He takes the time to explain WHY things are done a certain way, so you learn as you cook.

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  29. Lisa Resnick says:

    I planning to go to see Lidia @ Corrado’s Market in Wayne NJ on Sept 2ed (My birthday!) What a birthday gift having her sign the cookbook I won! And I’ll let my husband read to cook for me that night!!

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  30. carol mardis says:

    I don’t have a fail proof cookbook, but have fallen in love with Italian cooking and cookbooks ,since we went on a 3 week trip to Tuscany, Amalfi Coast and Rome. I’d like to have this cookbook, plain and simple!!!

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  31. gingermc says:

    My ‘fail-proof’ cookbook is “Bon Vivant”, a collection of recipes assembled by the ladies of the Episcopal Church in Longview, Tx. It has seen several ‘updates’ through the years, but the two that I have used so much date back to the 1960’s.

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  32. Kris says:

    It’s newer, but everything I’ve made from the Splendid Table’s How to Eat Supper cookbook is wonderful. The raspberry sauce is the simplest, most wonderful sauce ever — and keeps for 6 months in the frig.

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  33. Annette says:

    My go to book is a small envelope folder with some of my mom recipes that she learned from her mom, my noni Festa and noni Petrella.
    the rest of her recipes were in her head, but I was lucky enough to learn some of these before she passed. the little blue envelope will always be with me.
    i refuse to buy store bought food especially Italian but I do buy the best ingredients.
    i look forward to looking through chef, Lidia Bastianich cookbooks. Our recipes have also traveled from one generation to the next

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  34. Dee Treece says:

    My favorite cook books are usually from the Junior Leagues around the country.
    I love Italian cooking and my goal is to go to Italy next year and learn what I can and ear fabulous food and take in the culture. I am learning to speak Italian and want to enjoy all that I can.

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  35. Margarita says:

    Hands down the Silver Palate Cookbook by Julee Rosso & Sheila Lukins. I’ve had this copy for about 15 years and people still rave over its recipes. I always look good with any of these recipes.

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  36. Jeany says:

    The Joy of Cooking – whenever I forget some of the basics – it always has the answer!

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  37. Wendi Dusek says:

    My go-to cookbook for almost everything is Better Homes and Gardens – the checkerboard always seems to have the answer for me!!

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  38. anna sattali says:

    Most of my recipes are in my head. I usually don’t use recipes.

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  39. Ruth Chamberlain says:

    The closest thing I have to a fail proof cookbook is my Grange cookbook, however, even owning a cookbook collection, I do NOT have a fail proof one.

    That is why I want yours!

    Thanks

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  40. suzanne says:

    No, I DO NOT have a “Go To” Cookbook, but I sure wish I did! Instead, I find myself pouring over the “Food Section” in the Sunday Newspaper looking for something interesting to cook that week. Ah Ha!
    It would have to be easier to have a Winning Book of recipes that I could count on!

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  41. Charleen B Dowell says:

    Settlement Cookbook is one of my favorites. It is so old that it is falling apart.

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  42. Faith Rogers says:

    My memories of my family almost all include sitting around the table eating or cooking together. Many cookbooks from my mother are on my shelf.

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  43. Lois says:

    I’ve got two, I’m afraid… I received the Good Housekeeping cookbook for my 10th birthday, back in… the sixties. I made oven-fried chicken, I think, as my first venture–quite adventurous for a kid! It’s still my go-to for some family basics and traditions, like biscuits and popovers; I’ve had to adapt to include fewer prepared ingredients and increase healthy quotients. My old Fanny Farmer has the best muffin recipe. And I energize my cooking with lots of new books and blogs.

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  44. Barbara Day says:

    At fifty-eight years old, I find myself with a lot of time on my hands, so I have taken the plunge into learning how to cook something other than New England boiled dinners, which was my mother’s mainstay. I recently bought JAMIE’S FOOD REVOLUTION by Jamie Oliver. The receipes have been a pleasant surprise, as they are easy to make and have a punch of flavor with few ingredients. My palate is not very sophisticated so there is no deviation of ingredients for me! lol

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  45. CASSIE says:

    MARTHA STEWART’S SIMPLE DINNERS COOKBOOK FOR RECIPES FOR THE YOUNG PROFESSIONAL ON THE GO. IT’S DELIGHTFUL, FULLY PHOTOGRAPHED AND SIMPLE RECIPES TO LEARN.

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  46. Kerry says:

    I absolutely love my mom’s old “Better Homes and Garden” cookbook, it has some great recipes and she added a few of her own, I also added some of my sister’s recipes and mine to it. My daughter and daughter-in-law also love some of these recipes.

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  47. marilyn says:

    My mainstay is The Original Betty Crocker Cookbook passed down from generations…however, technology has changed a bit, so I am looking to plunge into the NOW!!!

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  48. 1LilLady says:

    My go-to book, Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cookbook. I have had it in my kitchen for 20+ years now, and you can tell by the wear ‘n tear I use it regularly.

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  49. Alexandra says:

    My fail-proof cookbook is a combination of two cookbooks.
    The first one is “The Joy of Cooking”.
    It was the only American cookbook that my mother owned back in Italy. While growing up back home -in Italy-, she would get the cookbook and take some of the recipes -not knowing how to read English, I would translate-, and tweak them with an Italian twist, with whatever was available.
    I remember she had prepared the Best Apple Pie ever, with the flakiest crust…. It was my 16th Birthday, and all my friends were literally drooling over it, and 30 years later +/-, I still think of it, and have not been able to replicate it. Unfortunately she has since passed.
    This will always be one of my sweetest culinary memories.
    My other cookbook is an Italian cookbook “Il Cucchiaio D’Argento”, I was surprised a few years ago to finally find the English edition -“The Silver Spoon”-, here in the US.
    It’s the combination of these two cookbooks that enable me to come up with dishes that let me stay close to my roots -Italian/American-, and also help me in trying to create almost fail-proof dishes.
    I would like to add, that watching Lidia on PBS, also helps me discover new Italian dishes. The beauty of their simplicity and the complexity of their flavor…. If they would only come out like hers… It would be a different story, maybe my mom would even be proud…

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  50. Annamarie Dodge says:

    I do have a no fail cookbook, its called “from my grandmother’s kitchen”, and it was put together by my friend who i a professional chef, my true go to cookbook when i want a truly authentic german dish for dinner or entertaining

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  51. Arty4Me2 says:

    It’s called Trial and Error with a lot of experience thrown in there 🙂

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  52. Kim Reed says:

    I have a cookbook that was given to my mother as a wedding present 58 years ago. It was published by the Norge Refrigerator company. It is about 4 inches thick and has all the “trendy” 50’s recipes. It also has recipes that are basic cooking (ie deviled eggs) as well as more complex dishes such as steamed plum pudding (a Christmas tradition to this day). I remember pouring through it as a child dreaming of owning the book one day. I learned to cook from that book and I still go to it for cooking tips and just to remember my mother and Grandmother on nostalgic days.

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  53. Patricia Assanowicz says:

    What was handed down to me started with my Great Grandmother to my Mom, everything was written in 4 Diary type books, all hand written and very interesting, my Dad was raised on my Greatgrannies farm and his favorite was Dandylion soup, I did not even know you could eat these things, I always thought they were weeds. When my Dad told me things were very rough, they ate alot of what was grown and my Great Granny knew how to make everything taste great. These are my cookbooks, I did not want to condense everything into one book, I feel closer to my relatives just the way they are, and I will continue to write in those and pass them down to my grand children to keep the tradition going.

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  54. Dee says:

    I have many cookbooks and I love trying recipes from them all. My very first cookbook was a Better Homes & Gardens cookbook and I still love it!

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  55. MG Stewart says:

    Not yet, but would like to!

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  56. Chantal says:

    I really don’t have a fail proof cookbok that I run to..Most of my recipes are in my head, but I’ve love to have one of Lydia’s because I love Italian food! ♥♥♥

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  57. Judy frederick says:

    Women’s Home Companion Cook Book. My late husbands mother gave it to me as a shower gift 46 years ago. I have used it so much it is coming apart I would love to get your cook book to give to my granddaughter who got married on what would have been married on my 46th wedding anniversary so she has a special cook book like I did.

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  58. Gwen Surell says:

    My “fail-proof” cookbook is the Doubleday CookBook that I bought from the Doubleday Book Club when I first moved out on my own 32 years ago. The spines are broken, and one of the two cookbooks opens immediately to my favorite recipe for Banana Tea Bread (which I SHOULD have memorized, but always refer back to). Although I am not ready to retire this 2-volume set, I am always ready to add to my collection of cookbooks. That being said, I would be thrilled to win your cookbooks, as I do not have any authentic Italiam cookbooks.

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  59. Rosie says:

    I love my Better Homes and Gardens anyone can cook cookbook.

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  60. Patricia says:

    My favorite cookbook is The Searchlight Recipe Book first published in 1931. This cookbook was sold by The Household Magazine with receipts submitted from 1925 to 1942. My cookbook was published in 1944 the year I was born and was owned by my Mother until her death this past January at the age of 94. All the handwritten receipts my Mother used over the years are also part of this cherished cookbook. I will pass this cookbook to my daughter and then she will pass it on to her daughter.

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  61. Diane Jean says:

    I do indeed have a fail proof cookbook. It is in my head. I was blessed by growing up in a family with two ethnic backgrounds, Italian & Slovenian. I learned the best cooking from both grandmothers and my mother. All these recipes live on in my head because they were never written down. Someday I hope to do that for my children so that the recipes will remain in the family even after I’m gone.

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  62. Karen says:

    I have watched her shows and I know her cookbook will be good

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  63. mary says:

    I love my Good Housekeeping cookbook. It’s straightforward and has a variety of recipes.

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  64. Julie Teeples says:

    A fail proof cookbook? Not yet LOL, I’d need to go through each recipie I want to try before it earns the title failproof. I haven’t been able to find a cook book that I can embrace, love and eagerly want to make each and every recipie. I want to own a cookbook with folded over pages, and smudged with ingredients; that’s a cookbook! That’s what I would call “failproof”.

    I adore Lidia (my mothers name) I would love to get the pages of her cookbook worn, smelling and stained with pasta sauce, dusted with flour, and sticky with her desserts, that would make her cookbook my fail proof cookbook.

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  65. doreen Mallozzi Hicks says:

    I have been using my Goodhousekeeping Cookbook since 1981, the year I was married. I have tried almost every recipe from soup to nuts. I have never been disappointed. I have catered many parties with some of these recipes. It’s considered my very own bible. I stand behind the Goodhousekeeping seal of approval.

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  66. Myra Garber says:

    My fail-safe cookbook is “The Joy of Cooking.” I received it for an engagement present 36 years ago, and it still yields basic knowledge and techniques.

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  67. mary beth zeni says:

    I can’t decide on only one fail-proof cookbook – it depends on the country. I have one of Lidia’s cookbooks and it is a staple for Italian cooking.

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  68. debbi frank says:

    I use a lot of handed down recipes, but could use Lidia’s book for my never fail cookbook…her food is fantastico!

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  69. Diana Tumay says:

    I’m a baker and my fail – safe cookbook is Classic Home Desserts. Real home, comfort foods that your mom and grandmother used to make.

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  70. D Comeaux says:

    Good Housekeeping, it has all the basic.

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  71. Valarie Bay says:

    I actually enjoy my receipes given by family/friends/cooking classes, and Cooking Light magazine/Southern Living magazine.

    But the cookbook that has been with me the longest and has several of my tried and true receipes is :Good Housekeeping Cookbook.

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  72. janne mahan says:

    My new favorite cookbook is one that I have known of for YEARS, and just recently bought. It’s the “I Hate to Cook Book” by Peg Bracken; it was written to expedite the 3x a day task of providing tasty meals for the family by someone who doesn’t really know how to or necessarily desire to spend time cooking. It’s witty, full of easy delicious dishes, with generally few ingredients, and WHO doesn’t like to save time when we’re in a pinch? I’m a culinary professional and I really appreciate the inspiration this book provides.

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  73. Marcia Robinson says:

    I religiously watch Lidia’s program on PBS every Sunday and have been fortunate to have dined at her restaurant on several occasions. Love her!

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  74. Mariarosa says:

    My favorite, no-fail cookbook is “Cucina Rustica” by Viana LaPlace and Evan Kleiman. Simple, wonderful Italian recipes.

    My Italian mother and I often watch Lidia at the same time while we are on the phone, commenting to each other on what she is doing!

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  75. Karen Bryner says:

    I’ve used so many cookbooks over the years and I have to say that I have my go-to versions of certain recipes in different books. But, overall, I guess the book I use the most is Better Homes & Gardens.

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  76. Patrick says:

    “I would love to give this new cookbook to my mom as she practically lives in the kitchen!”

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  77. Sunnymay says:

    My mom gave me a cookbook that’s rather beaten up because it’s so good. It’s one their group compiled with members’ recipes. I love the My Turn For Treat Bars and my kids, now teen and up, still ask for them. It was always the treat I brought to potluck and is a variation on Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars.
    The other is my Pillsbury Cook-Off Recipes For Cookies and is rather splattered and weathered. My mouth just waters thinking about it and looking at the pictures gets to me every time.

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  78. Kai W. says:

    I used spend time in the kitchen when I was living away from home. I would be buying cook books to try new recipes. Since I moved back home, my Mom and I have been competing with each other on who is going to cook. Mom wins every time.

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  79. Vicky DiNetta says:

    I love Lydia her food and stories are great. My old standby? Joy of Cooking

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  80. Vonne says:

    My fail-proof cookbook is one I’ve had 20+ years from my grandmother. She and other women from her church put it together for a fundraiser, all contributing good home recipes. They lived in a town with a large Czech community, also a German influence, so there is even an ethnic component. It ranges from simple recipes to teach kids to cook, to traditional American church-style pot luck dishes, to holiday treats. It has never let me down.

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  81. Jacey Cline says:

    Not really, maybe one of these is going to be it!

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  82. judi brown says:

    my failsafe cookbook is the Betty Crocker cookbook I got when I was a teenager. It’s still the cookbook I go back to for basics. And, beyond that, I have the recipe book my grandmother wrote her recipes in. I’ve updated some of the recipes but some, I have to keep just as they were – there is no improving on them! And then there is anything by Rick Bayless… But, I love cookbooks and each one has a spcial place in my heart and is a go to book for some reason! I’d love to add these to my “go to” collection!

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  83. Kristie Godwin says:

    Definitely the Betty Crocker cookbook my mother gave me in the late 70’s. I go back to it time and again when I can’t quite find what I want in my newer cookbooks. There’s a recipe for a cake called the Dinette cake, and I’ve used it for years. It’s so easy, but is moist and tastes really great. It was my first cookbook.

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  84. Karen Pele says:

    I have been using recipes from Everyday Italian with Giada De Laurentis. But I also watch Lidia every week. She reminds me so much of my husband’s grandmother. I have very fond memories of being at my in-laws and enjoying the wonderful aroma of everything that was made from scratch. The best memory was watching Mama Ragazzo making homemade lasagna, simple the best thing I have ever eaten!

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  85. Debbie Chaney says:

    I have a whole library of cookbooks, but I can’t really say that any of them are really failproof. I’m a working mom with 3 teens at home, so I look for timesaving recipes that I can cook in 30 minutes or less. If I had more time to cook like a pro, I guess my favorites would be Betty Crocker and Southern Living.

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  86. Maduke says:

    When I was a young girl, we had Better Homes and Gardens cookbook. I learned a lot of recipes from that and haven’t used a cookbook since.

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  87. sherie says:

    you know i do not have a fail proof cookbook. but i sure would love to have a nice one now. i used to entertain a lot when i was married. now divorded and haven’t really cooked since on my own. just being me and all. but…i miss cooking like i use to! maybe if i had the right cookbook…who know!!

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  88. Carolyn says:

    My old reliable and my Mother’s also is Betty Crocker, the older edition.

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  89. Cynthia Gagliardi says:

    My favorite cookbook is one put together by employees of the company that I worked for 20 years ago. They are all tried and true recipes for everything from beverages to appetizers to main courses to desserts. They are all great and all favorites of the people that i worked with at the time. It is amazing how often I go back to this collection of well-loved recipes more than any other cookbook I own.

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  90. Rose Folks says:

    I was able to secure an old copy of The American Women’s Cookbook on Ebay, the same cookbook my grandmother used when I was a child. Lots of wonderful recipes to remind me of her.

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  91. Bianca Mandel says:

    My fail-proof “cookbook” is the one I put together with recipes collected during my life in Italy in the 1970’s and on subsequent trips to my favorite country. Whenever I watch Lidia’s Table on my local public broadcasting network, I am taken right back to Italy. Her cooking is so authentic! Having Lidia’s cookbooks would complete my collection, and I doubt that I would ever have to turn to other cookbooks again!

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  92. Shellie Robin says:

    My all time favorite is the “Joy of Cooking”. But I do love Lydia and have watched her shows on PBS. She loves to cook and I love to watch her!!!

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  93. Barbara P says:

    I have not yet found that fail proof cookbook though I will die trying. The one that has come in handy the most up to now has been a cookbook on Classic Cuban Dishes loosely translated is “Minute Kitchen” some recipes I’ve used over and over again and the pages are stained. I bought one for my daughter when she got married too.

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  94. Gail Anderson says:

    I can count on my Southern Living Cookbook – I have been using it for 29 years and every thing I have prepared from it is good. This is really a good thing as I tend to experiment on guests by trying a new recipe!

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  95. kathie says:

    love my joy of cooking

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  96. Sharon says:

    In high school in 1961, I was required to purchase the Betty Crocker Cookbook for my Home Ec class. Over the years I have returned to it often for basics. The book is held together with elastic bands, but I’d NEVER think of parting with it. Not many Italian recipes in it so I’d love to add Lidia’s collection to my tried and true one.

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  97. Mary Lynn says:

    Biba Caggiano’s Modern Italian Cooking was the first great pesto recipe I ever found. I also love Paula Wolfert’s Moroccan cookbook. I have too many cookbooks, but would love to add Lydia’s – I love her!

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  98. Tom Bellamy says:

    No I don’t.

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  99. Linda Arzoumanina says:

    My all time used and used and used cookbook is one from the 1950’s or early 60’s. It is ring binder from Betty Crocker.
    I recently read a newspaper article about a “new recipe” and recognized it as the French Breakfast Puffs right out of the very old and very tattered Betty Crocker cookbook in my cupboard.

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  100. Joetta Gillespie says:

    Betty Crocker, I use it to make sure I am not overcooking meats. My mom gave it to me 30 years ago when I got married. I plan to give one to each neice when they marry. Great starter book.

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  101. Jennifer says:

    It’s not really a cookbook persay, it’s actually a way of life. Six months ago, before I started losing weight, I actually found a book called the Flat belly diet. I didn’t buy the cookbook yet, but the diet starts out with a four day anti-bloat jumpstart. I was eating chicken or fish and rice with a vegetable, drinking water and smoothies four four days. And it WORKED! I lost five pounds in four days. Needless to say, the very LAST day of the jumpstart I quit. Reason why? That was the weekend of the huge blizzard of 2010 in the north eastern states. We had 27 inches of snow that week. PLUS we had lost our electricity for four nights (others were not lucky enough, though. Some areas still hadn’t had electricity for weeks after the first storm). Anyway, I did not have to quit, but it wasn’t cutting it for me because of the storm and we were eating what we could out of the refrigerator for fear of losing the food anyway. I DO plan on getting back on this diet, and I hope to soon!!! 🙂 Really great recipes, and they help you LOSE WEIGHT!!!

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  102. thereislightonthehorizon says:

    I’ve relied on Betty Crocker’s 1970 edition 🙂 and of course I shop and buy as many local church and school recipe cookbooks as I can. I love that these are recipes from friends and neighbors and love to try new recipes 🙂

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  103. Mary Benton says:

    My ‘go to’ cookbook used to be ‘The Joy of Cooking’ – it was the zen of all cooking for me. However, now that I am trying to focus myself and my family on healthy eating, I go to the ‘Mediterranean Diet Cookbook’. Ultimately, though, I am Italian through and through, and I constant crave (and want to recreate) the wonderful dishes of my childhood. I think Lydia’s book will bring all that back to me.

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  104. Sue Piner says:

    My never fail cookbook is on the computer! I can find anything there. I love Lidia and watch her on PBS. I watch Food TV Network, the new Cooking Channel and what ever is good on the Travel Channel. I love to cook and eat and travel. Life is good.

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  105. Sara says:

    My great great grandfather came from Italy many years ago. I never met him but heard wonderful things about him, specially from my grandma. She got two things from him, whenever you walk in their home there was something on the stove to be offered to you and would always cook wonderful recipes from scratch. My grandma would let us cook with her but never wrote the recipes, when she died I took the time to talk to my aunts and mother and gather some of my favorite ones, I could not fail with those, my children love them. That is my recipe book.

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  106. Diane Hance says:

    Favorite cookbooks are the Betty Crocker Cookbook and The Joy of cooking. Cookbooks offer wonderful ways to broaden ones food experiences and I am always llooking for new ones.

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  107. mary ellen mcmahon says:

    All the cookbooks that I seem to use the most were sold by different organizations. It gives me a broad selection of different recipes passed down from family generations. Sometimes the old recipes are the best. I have used these time and again to prepare my meals. I have always been told I was a good cook and I give all the credit to the people of past generations with there wonderful ideas.

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  108. karen mazza says:

    i have a cookbook from my parents church. All the women submitted their favorite recipes. Many were 1st generation Italian so it is a great mix of old country recipes and new discoveries.

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  109. Susan Bishop says:

    It’s “The Joy of Cooking,” and the Italian “Silver Spoon,” recently translated into English for the first time (although now I wish I spoke Italian!).

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  110. Gabrielle says:

    My failproof cookbook is a compilation of recipies that I wrote down over the years when cooking with my mother and grandmother. I have yet to taste anything comparable to my mother’s bracciole, spedini or stuffed artichokes. One day I hope to pass it on to my family.

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  111. mary pirmorac says:

    I received The Settlement Cookbook for my wedding shower many years ago and I still refer to that cookbook. I am also on my second Betty Crocker book. The first one did fall apart.

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  112. Peggy Schell says:

    I have printed one cookbook of my favorite recipes and gave each of my brothers and sisters one, now we as a family are working on one. This one will have a lot more of Mom & Dad’s recipes, which I didn’t have. Being raised on a ranch, we grow all our own vegies and raised our own meat.

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  113. Nadia Conitz says:

    The cookbooks I reach for most often are the Cooking Light Annual Cookbooks. Italian food is my favorite and when I need a comfort food fix I reach for Nick Slellino’s Mediterranean Flavors. Lidia’s American Kitchen is also on my bookshelf and I love her on television.

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  114. ogden kruger says:

    there is nothing like farm to table, or as i say yard to table! we have a bounty this summer of many tomatoes and I would love an expert opinion on what to do with them!

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  115. Jo Cavins says:

    I love her books.

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  116. Donna Witiak says:

    The cookbook I keep going back to is my Betty Crocker Cookbook I received as a new bride 35 years ago. But all of my Italian “recipes” come from my nonna. She passed away when I was 16 but memory the flavors of Italy from her kitchen are forever in my memory.

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  117. Rose Shuman says:

    I have many cookbooks, because I collect them, especially anything different, and not run of the mill. However, I must say that my husband is the best cookbook we have. He has a natural talent to take any recipe and add his own ingredients and spices to make the best dish possible. His specialty is Asian cooking, since he spent seven years living in Japan. Most of the time we go to the market, pick up ingrediants and make up our own dishes. It’s the best!

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  118. Debra Scandone says:

    Everyday Italian, by Giada De Laurentiis.
    I love it because she really uses everyday ingredients, the recipes are delicious and easy to make. Even though it’s “everyday” recipes are good for company too. Besides being Italian myself I love Italian foods and different regions have different tastes so it’s always new and fresh.

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  119. Hannah B. says:

    When I first got married, over 40 years ago, I bought a Betty Crocker cookbook and it was the only one I had for many years. I used it so often, it was like a trusted friend and it never gave me bad advice! My cookbook collection grew over time, but Betty still has a place of honor in my kitchen and I refer to it for all of my basic questions.

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  120. Robyn says:

    My fail-proof cookbook would have to be “Seasoned with Love” edition #3. I do not know how long I have had this but I am sure it was passed down by my mother. It has basic information on cuts of meat, tempatures to cook, everything a cook needs to know. It has several recipes from the beginning of a meal to end. Many recipes that are traditional and always a “pleaser to one’s appetite”. I have always wanted to try another ethnic cooking and would be honored to win this set. By the way, she is a true cook, stainless steel pots and pans, the only way to cook !!!! Kudo’s to the chef !!!

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  121. Leslie Carcaise says:

    My Betty Crocker 1974 edition cookbook. Pages torn and falling out but I won’t give it up. Well used and well loved!

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  122. pam watkinson says:

    My favorite cookbook is Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, published in 1961 by McGraw-Hill. My mother worked for McGraw-Hill and bought the first copy on sale from the company’s book store. It contains the menu for Caroline Kennedy’s circus birthday party. When I was old enough, I learned to cook using this book. It’s like an old, comfortable friend that I still turn to as a reference. A few years ago, when the original book was literally in tatters, I bought a replacement copy on ebay, never suspecting it had become a rather expensive collectible due to the beautiful
    graphics. Perhaps it has become a vintage collectible because others loved it, too.

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  123. carol berman says:

    My favorite cookbook is More Home Cooking. In addition to great recipes is wonderful commentary on: food, recipes, attitudes towards food and cooking. Lydia’s cookbooks offer warmth, great recipes and commentary on food, eating and ingredients.

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  124. Natalie J. Vandenberghe says:

    I check many resources (cookbook collection and online) for recipes. The cookbook that means the most to me is “The Joy of Cooking” which my step-dad (a professional chef) gave me more than 40 years ago! It’s special to me because of what he wrote inside. He was a wonderful man (married my mom in 1963 when she was a widow with five children) and a great cook!

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  125. Jerry Goldchain says:

    “Bride in the kitchen” is very good cookbook. Lots of good and easy meals.

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  126. sissyh13 says:

    I love Lidia and to have the opportunity to have the recipes within arms reach is priceless.

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  127. KC says:

    My favorite is Joy of Cooking for all the basics. I check it all the time to double check current recipes for cooking times, proportions, etc.

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  128. Bettie Claxton says:

    My favorite cookbook depends on what my problem is. If I can’t figure out how to do something or am looking for ideas, I go to the Joy of Cooking. If I’m just looking for a good recipe, I look through recipes that I have downloaded through the years. If I don’t find it there, I just go to the Internet and look. Frequently, I end up taking part of one recipe and mashing it up with part of another.

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  129. Sandy says:

    The Silver Palate cookbook has never let me down…

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  130. Sue Roberts says:

    My favorite never fail cookbooks are some of the old standbys, The Better Homes & Gardens Cook Book, Joy of Cooking and anything by Emeril. My family really identifies with his sense of spice and flavor.

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  131. Julie Hahn says:

    I love church fundraiser cookbooks. My mother had so many in her cupboard and used them all the time. You can’t go wrong with recipes submitted that are favorites! I also love the America’s Test Kitchen books; especially for learning various cooking techniques.

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  132. Margarida says:

    My fail proof cook book is “Supercook A-Z.”

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  133. Barbara R says:

    My Betty Crocker Cook Book would be my old favorite all worn pages and stained from cooking. It was passed down from my Mom, who alway cooked from scratch all our favorites. It was Good Basic American Food. She recently passed away and I will miss her and cherish the gift of the cookbook and her lessons in cooking.

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  134. karen spector says:

    I have a fail-proof cookbook it is on the shelf with hundreds of my other cookbooks. The title of which is “Cooking Jewish” it is by Judy Bart Kancigor. This book is compiled of traditional Jewish food, lots of pictures from the 1950’s, 60’s, 70’s etc of family eating, celebrating and just living their daily lives. It is a truly remarkable cookbook with lots of pictures, humor and best of all traditional recipes. I gave a copy of this book to my brother who likes to cook. He adores this gift given with love from the bottom of my heart.

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  135. Phyllis E. Marie says:

    The book I always turn to when I have a question that my more fancy cookboks cannot answer is the original Betty Crocker Cookbook. My Mom’s friend gave it to me as a going away present when I headed off to college and my first apartment. It literally taught me how to cook. It’s shabby from 50 years of use, but still up there on my shelf to pull out whenever I need it.
    I have been to Felidia’s on several occasions in New York and have thoroughly enjoyed myself every time. I’m sure that the receipes are just as good in the cookbook as at the wonderful restaurant.

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  136. callelaine says:

    My Grandmother taught me how to cook. She was an excellent cook; unfortunately she didn’t teach my Mother. Grandmothers somehow have much more patience with their grandchildren than they do with their own children. I still love to cook and my husband says I am a great cook. I will never forget that apple pie I made with my Grandmother and I think she inspired me to cook. I have her cookbook and I treasure it greatly. Cookbooks and cooking show great love.

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  137. Grace Tracy says:

    The original Moosewood Cafe cookbook. It was first published in the early 70’s when I was in my early 20’s when vegetarian cooking was just taking hold in the mainstream. My sister lived up in Ithaca during the early 70’s and we would go to the Moosewood restaurant to sample the dishes in person. They always made us smile from how good they tasted. I use this today as a sentimental food bible, since my sister passed away 2 years ago, it even has more meaning. Love all the recipes using whole grains and vegetables and have collected all the other Moosewood cookbooks. Good healthy eating – nothing beats it!

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  138. Sue says:

    I am not sure if I have a favorite cookbook. I have my mothers and a number of others. Some from family and some from churches. I do have one from the Ladies Aux. of Huntsville, AL and I do love it. I think you need cookbooks of all kinds!! You never know what your taste buds will want.

    I watch Lidia regularly and love the foods she prepares. She is so helpful in explaining all she does. I do not have one of her books but would love to get one. She goes a step beyond the triditional Italian cooking.

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  139. Ruth Boudreaux says:

    “Talk About Good” cookbook-the first volume from the Junior League in Lafayette La has the best collection of authentic Cajun cooking-its an old stand by-I had to buy a new volume because my 20 year old original copy was so beat up-lol! its also a great gift for new cooks to discover wonderful cooking of the Acadiain region of Louisiana

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  140. Valerie says:

    I have an old (1970’s) United Methodist Church cookbook with wonderful recipes by many women who have now passed on. I learned how to make a darn good pie crust and the best Banana Bread ever from these women.

    BTW, if any FAB women make it to Kansas City, you must visit Lida’s Restaurant at the Kansas City Freighthouse. The food is FAB, the ambience is FAB and the service impecable. We love to eat there for girls night out and then walk down the sidewalk to listen to KC Jazz!!

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  141. Karen says:

    Lately, we’ve been relying on the cookbook from “America’s Test Kitchen”. Great recipes, helpful tips, well-illustrated, and virtually fail-proof. It’s a great resource, for experienced and inexperienced cooks alike.

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  142. Sandra Nelson says:

    I love your cooking, its just so simple since I have all the ingredients.

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  143. Ellen Miller says:

    I really don’t have many cookbooks. My paternal grandparent were born in Italy. My grandfather from the Naples area and grandmother was Sicilian and cooked with her “gut”. She always told me “a good cook will just know what to do”, heaven help me! I’ve had a few good creations but for the most part I would have to say I’m not a “good cook”. I would love to have a guide from a “good cook”.
    By the way, after my grandmother pasted away my Aunt found a cookbook of grandma’s……all recipes hand written.

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  144. Janet Keyser says:

    I like to think that a cookbook my mom gave me from her church’s Altar Society is the best source for me to use for my cooking needs.

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  145. merrill plumlee says:

    I have always went to The Joy Of Cooking when really stuck- it has everything I need- it’s my “old reliable”!

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  146. Jaye Mathews says:

    I have had my Betty Crocker Cookbook as a best loved and well used book for more than 25 years. I am a lover of fresh vegies, and am inspired by the dishes from great cooks like the recipes in her book.

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  147. TippyJo says:

    My “go-to” book is “IF THE BUDDHA CAME TO DINNER” – How to Nourish your body to awaken your spirit. By Hale Sofia Schatz & Shira Shaiman
    This book has simple and nutritious recipes. Although this book covers “cleansing”, it’s main purpose to get you to think about what you are putting in your body. It emphasizes season eating. When I need to replenish my body with good food, I look to this book to remind me of simple foods to “nourish my body and awaken my spirit”. Think of yourself as Buddha and what food you would want to eat. Truly is a keeper!

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  148. Erika Bradley says:

    One cookbook I frequently refer to is Bell’s Best, a compilation of recipes written by Ma Bell employees in 1981.
    I usually scour yard sales for old cookbooks and my favorite is Wonderful Ways to Prepare Crepes and Pancakes printed in 1979.
    I love it when food looks like food and not a swatch from a Picasso painting.
    Lidia’s cooking always makes me nostalgic. My parents were born in the same area of Istria that she hails from and many of her recipes I remember my Mom making years ago.

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  149. JoAnn says:

    I don’t really have a fool proof cookbook, but I use recipes that I learned from my mother when I was young. They are tried and true and my family loves them — like her homemade meatballs; pot roasts and baked chicken; stuffing at Christmas and the best breakfasts around!

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  150. Elizabeth says:

    Betty Crocker’s for all the basic stuff; love to watch (and often put in practice the same day) Lidia on PBS and definitely would love to own more of her books.

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  151. Joanne says:

    Although I go to my old fave, The Joy of Cooking, I usually make up recipes by combining things that seem as if they’d go well together. It works just about every time! Still, I love to collect cookbooks, and each time I get a new one, I make at least half a dozen of the best things I find there. It’s fun, as it would be if I were to win this giveaway!

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  152. Nancy says:

    “World Vegetarian”: yummy dishes with an ethnic flair!

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  153. Rhona Gordon says:

    I have a very large cookbook collection, but the ones I go to most often are Ina Garten’s Barefoot Contessa series. Of those, her Barefoot in Paris is my favorite. It has simple and elegant ideas for food I love. I met Lidia once and love her cookbooks also… her style is so approachable and her recipes are fantastic. I would love to add them to my collection.

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  154. Rhoda Tanner says:

    I have a home made cook book from an organization that my mother belongs to from years back. I use
    it constantly and recently discovered a recipe we are both using quite frequently.

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  155. Janelle Rickermann says:

    The Joy of Cooking is the pillar of my cooking library, complete with ways to use each recipe and most with a history or anecdote. Doesn’t get much better than this one!

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  156. Suburbohemian says:

    Barefoot Contessa at Home does it for me!

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  157. Jody Jordan says:

    My favorite cook book is the one from memory. I remember standing side by side with my grandma and I loved walking into her kitchen, now I love even more learning all the tricks from my mom who every Sunday still we have lunch at her home. I have all the cookbooks from my grandma well all the ones that mom would give up and I still go back to the basic memory and taste.

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  158. Kaylene Lee says:

    My fail-proof cookbooks name is”The commonsense cookery book 1&2″ My mother ,grandmother and great grandmother all had a version of these books. I am originally from Australia and these 2 books are very dear to me.The pages of mine are well worn some more than others.Some of the recipes are so simple like how to boil and egg and others are complicated.When my daughter leaves home i am going to get my sister to buy her copies of the books so she also can have somefool-proof recipes to follow and also some recipes from her birthplace.

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  159. Rose Berta says:

    I received the 1963 copyright edition of the Good Housekeeping Cookbook from my German mother when I got married in 1977. She said that this is the book that gave her the confidence to cook everyday meals for my Italian father. She learned to cook Italian from his mother and aunts in the Calabrese style. I married a Hungarian-German man who was not as demanding, but a picky eater. As a young working bride with absolutely no culinary knowledge except for a love to eat, this is the book that I used. After 33 years, four children, three grandchildren and many recipe books later I am still turning through its food stained pages.

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  160. Lynne says:

    The Great American Brand Name Cookbook is a family favorite. Delicious, easy to make recipes with the ingredients anyone would have in their cupboard. My mother passed it down to me and I will pass it along to my daughter.

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  161. Donna O'Sullivan says:

    My treasured cookbook is my Mom’s Fanny Farmer Boston Cooking School Cookbook. My Mom passed away a few years ago at the age of 90, after teaching all seven of us children (6 of them boys!) to cook. Her cookbook is old and worn, with notes she made on some of the pages. But the best thing about it is the story behind it. When she and my father married, he gave it to her as a gift on their first Christmas together. SHE THREW IT AT HIM!!! She was highly insulted at the thought he would imagine she would need a cookbook!!!

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  162. Karen Stephenson says:

    Our local electric cooperative published a cookbook years ago that has some of the best recipes in it. My copy is probably over 40 years old as I used it in high school. It is compiled of recipes from the farm wives in this area. They are some of the best cooks and they did it all without microwaves! Some of these recipes are still my favorites today.

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  163. Vicky says:

    I have loads of cookbooks, along with a couple that were gathered and complied by our family of some of our favorite recipes. What I love most about Lidia is that she cooks for the heart and soul of family. This I found very similar to our family cooking style. A couple of my favorite cookbooks are Betty Crocker and Southern Living.

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  164. Kathie says:

    My go-to cookbook is The Joy of Cooking. Of course, I rely on other sources—especially the Web—but if I have a question, this is where I typically find my answer.

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  165. Pamela Smith says:

    I don’t have a fail-proof cookbook because I have only just started to embrace cooking. The past sixteen years have been quite hectic and meals have been simple, healthy, on the go type of food. Now that the pace of my life has mellowed a bit I am ready to learn the ‘art’ of cooking.

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  166. Fabulous Mimi says:

    that’s italian!

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  167. BethD says:

    My favorite right now is The Food You Crave by Ellie Krieger. The recipes are simple, easy, healthful and always quite yummy. I have many others that I rely on as well, including Everyday Italian by Giada de Laurentiis and almost anything by America’s Test Kitchen.

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  168. nancy says:

    My mother passed away at 85 years old and when I was cleaning out her apartment I found an old Betty Crocker cookbook that I remember her using when I was a little girl. Now years later, I still go back to that cookbook for reciepes.

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  169. Ana M Gutierrez says:

    I don’t have a foolproof book per say…I look up receipes on line when I see shows and I like whay they are cooking.. Faves are Barefoot Contessa, Giada, Rick Bayles and of course I Loved to watch Lidia when her shows were on. I have always liked the way she presented, I felt like it was my mom showing me how to cook. I am Hispanic so therefore Mexican cooking was what I was taught, BUT, I LOVE Italian, so I taught myself to cook such awsome food.

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  170. Darla says:

    An old one from the 60’s called “America Cooks”. I think it was sponsored by a magazine, I know you had to send away for it.

    Very useful.

    Darla

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  171. Cyndi Goldfarb says:

    I use The Joy of Cooking when I do not search sites on the web. There are many recipes to choose from with good tips.
    This has helped me with my weight loss journey. 150 gone now.

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  172. Phylis Fitz says:

    My favorite cookbook is a Southern Living Cookbook dated 1999.

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  173. Jim De Arman says:

    There is a low carb cookbook that was sold as a fundraiser for a weight loss support group that has helped me loose and maintain my weight. It is recipes that they developed and that work. Since it was done as a fundraiser it was done to be sold directly by them and doesn’t have an IBSN number.

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  174. Suanne Scherr says:

    The best cookbooks are the organizational ones that are comprised of member’s favorites. My go to cookbook is called What’s Cookin’ With Hadassah?
    Not only does it contain delicious and easy recipes submitted by friends of mine, it also serves as a fundraiser. Hadassah is the largest Medical Center in the Middle East (Jerusalem) serving Jews, Christians and Moslems alike.

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  175. Janice Farr says:

    My fail safe cookbook is the Betty Crocker cookbook. I can quickly turn to something easily every time with great results! However, I also use several other tried and trues like the King Arthur Cookbooks when baking breads or the Vegetarian cookbook. Southern Living cookbook is a favorite stand by, Moosewood cookbook is another good one. Williams Sonoma does a great job with their specialty cookbooks as well. And SurLaTable cookbooks are great too 🙂 I love to cook and experiment with new things and dishes all the time 🙂 And would love to win these cookbooks! Thanks!

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  176. Julie Nolletti says:

    There are so many I adore, but one of my standouts is “Amarcord Marcella Remembers: The Remarkable Story of a Woman Who Started Out Teaching Science in a Small Town in Italy, and Ended Up Teaching…..” it gives hope to all of us frustrated home-bound cooks. And it is terribly inspiring…..

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  177. CathyK says:

    My favorite cookbooks are the ones published by local churches with family recipes and old-fashioned comfort food. Yum!!!

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  178. Jim De Arman says:

    There is a low carb cookbook that was sold as a fundraiser for a weight loss support group that has been wonderful to help me loose and maintain my weight. It doesn’t have an IBSN number as it is sold by the writer.

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  179. Liz says:

    Rachel Ray’s newest cookbook!

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  180. Kimberly says:

    I have a Betty Crocker Cookbook that used to be my Mom’s
    that is the one I use the most.

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  181. Karin says:

    My favorite no fail cookbook is Better Homes New Cookbook. It is easy to follow and it is about 30 years old.

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  182. Christie Johnson says:

    My Fannie Farmer Baking Cookbook is my go to.
    For desserts, for breads, pastries…it is my go-to cookbook because not only does it have several wonderfully easy recipes, it has the science behind why they work.

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  183. Regina Grigsby says:

    I love to have family gatherings! My family is the most important thing in my life and would love to have this cookbook to create great meals for them!

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  184. Nancy Bauer says:

    My go to cookbook is the one my Mom gave me 28 years ago when I got married…The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Cookbook.

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  185. cheryl werling says:

    My no fail cookbook is one I helped write over 20 years ago. At the time I was in a civic organization that was tied to the Jaycee’s. As a fundraiser project, my women’s group collected tried and true recipes from our own kitchens and then had them typed, printed and bound into spiral bound cook books.
    Mine doesn’t even have a cover anymore, I remember it was royal blue. I love that cookbook, it is worn, bent, stained, and torn but it is full of love, family and wonderful recipes.

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  186. Daisy Zeller says:

    For me, Joy of Cooking still makes a difference in how I cook. But I find myself gravitating a great deal to the new cooking blogs such as Orangette, Smitten Kitchen, Cookstr, etc.

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  187. Deb says:

    Would love to win this!

    My fave is Better Homes & Gardens – tried & true.

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  188. admin says:

    I love the Barefoot Contessa cookbooks as well! They are the best. Her recipes for Guacamole “salad” and beef tenderloin are family favorites.

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  189. Marci says:

    My mom gave me her “Joy of Cooking”. It’s still a classic.

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  190. Lois Black says:

    My favorite cookbook is no longer in print, but I still use it, and will continue to do so until all the pages fall apart (which they are beginning to do!):

    The Key to Chinese Cooking
    by Irene Kuo
    first published in 1977

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  191. Kim says:

    My go to cookbook is Betty Crocker, she gives you all the basics. But Paul Prodhomme is my favorite!!!

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  192. Maggie Jirouschek says:

    I love to watch her cook on TV – to own her cookbooks were be truly amazing

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  193. Louise Desina says:

    The Barefoot Contessa cookbooks are terrific. Tasty, quick, unassuming.

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  194. Shannon says:

    I have a Good Housekeeping Cook Book that is approximately 25 years old and it has absolutely everything in it. From measurements to substitutions to setting your table for any occasion and endless recepies, it is like a mother in a book. I reference it all the time.

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  195. admin says:

    KMM, that’s funny… I love “How to Cook Everything” (the non-vegetarian version).
    I also love Mark Bittman’s “Minimalist” videos on the NewYorkTimes.com – they are so simple!

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  196. RochelleB says:

    While I have loads of cookbooks, including several by Lidia, I find that I use The Joy of Cooking very often. It offers several options in its recipes so that you can easily vary a recipe depending on the ingredients that you have in the house.

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  197. Debbie Sorg says:

    My favorite ‘no fail’ cookbook is the Barefoot Contessa at Home. I love the ease of her recipes, and the presentation & taste are always a hit!

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  198. KMM says:

    I love ‘How to Cook Everything Vegetarian’ by Mark Bittman–there are so many recipes to choose from and each one is satisfying and surprisingly easy.

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