DrupalWomenQ-#7510

I need help with this job from one of the genealogists. “Stouser work” appeared on a female’s death certificate in the early 1900. I can’t find that word anywhere. Even allowing for poor writing, I can’t think what it is.

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25 Answers

  1. GenFriend wrote on :

    I can only think of one explanation that might fit that hasn’t already been mentioned and this is a longshot. Seamstresses that worked in factory jobs were sometimes referred to by the titles of their specific jobs – pressers or shirt stitchers as examples. Could this have referred to someone who worked sewing TROUSERS? “Trouser work” is the only option that occurs to me. It is the sort of work that a widow might have been allowed to do in the late 1800’s or early 1900’s. Also, at that particular time, there were a large number of men that simply left home and started again with new wives and new families in other locations. The families left behind were “widowed” as far as polite society was concerned and the ‘widows’ ended up with jobs that grew out of their domestic skills. My suspicion is actually that it is house work as others have suggested.

    If you think this is a likely option, you can check it in this manner. Go back one census to see if there is a clothing manufacturer in the area or look in a city directory for a tailor or sewing business. The 1900 Census for the area may give you clues based on the occupations of neighbors. If you can find this person in the census, you may possibly get another context clue to work with.

    As a last resort, you can always forward a copy of the document to a handwriting expert in the genealogy field….

    Reply
  2. clcrss wrote on :

    One more suggestion would be to compare what is on the death certificate for occupation with what was listed in census records. If you give me the name of the person, I’ll be glad to look her up in the census years preceeding her death to see what that work listing shows. clcs

    Reply
  3. aaevansdc wrote on :

    This one is a puzzler. Did you check the US census (if available) to see what occupation is listed for her? Housekeeping is most common occupation for women in earlier times.

    Reply
    • nanjones wrote on :

      I will suggest that to the lady who asked me. 1900 census would be a good start. Thanks

      Reply
  4. trishc wrote on :

    I agree with some of the others, if the death certificate was handwritten it may look like STOUSER but actually is HOUSE. I checked to see if possibly the word STOUSER was derived another language, but no luck. You can try to verify by searching for this individual in previous census records to see if it listed any occupation.

    Reply
    • nanjones wrote on :

      That was my next thought was to try other languages. Thanks

      Reply
  5. sshayward wrote on :

    It is really hard to tell unless I see the original document. There were many mis-spellings on the census reports. It is probably some type of housekeeping, but I am wondering if it could be “dowser”. Could you give us some more info on the report so we could see it?

    Reply
  6. photodetective wrote on :

    Do you have a scan of the document? I’d love to be able to see the original handwritten comment.

    Reply
  7. clcrss wrote on :

    I would have to see the death certificate to be sure … but it may just be poor handwriting and ‘stouser work’ may actually be’house work’ … another suggestion would be to check the handwriting styles for the time and place of when the death certificate was created … here is a link to see some of the many different writing styles of our ancestors: http://amberskyline.com/treasuremaps/oldhand.html

    Reply
    • montaguecottage wrote on :

      Thanks for that link clcrss – American old handwriting is slightly different to English hands of the same period.

      Reply
    • deestea wrote on :

      Thank you for this link. I really enjoyed reading several of the posts on the website 🙂

      Reply
  8. coll7777 wrote on :

    Could she have worked for a Stouser? There are Stouser’s in the census, in PA and Iowa.

    Reply
  9. rrjwj wrote on :

    I think it is probably Housework too. I have seen that on death certificates before.

    Reply
  10. karenrobert wrote on :

    Stouser isn’t a word I can find or heard of. Could you send me a copy of the original? Karen Robert, kbob1941@gmail.com.

    Reply
  11. liesahealy wrote on :

    Hi Nan,

    I’m not sure this would be “housework”. Almost all of the entries I’ve seen from that time period state that the woman’s occupation was “At Home”. Do you have, or can you establish, a link to the document so that we can take a look at it?

    Reply
  12. sblimes wrote on :

    Those who have already answered you that it is “house work” are probably correct. It is difficult to say without seeing the document. Transcribers try their best to read sources but some are difficult.

    Reply
  13. VMAH wrote on :

    I would need to see the original.

    Reply
  14. JaniceMSJ wrote on :

    Is there a way to post an image of the certificate?

    Reply
  15. relativelycurious wrote on :

    If I squint, Stouser work almost looks like House work… that’s my best guess. Good luck

    Reply
  16. Kathleen Riley-Daniels wrote on :

    Do you have an image of the death certificate? What part of the world is this from?

    Reply
  17. Ultimate-Genealogy wrote on :

    What is the location of death? I am leaning towards cotton mill or textile job.

    Reply
    • nanjones wrote on :

      Yes, it was in the south. Someone brought it up at my genealogy class and I was stumped.

      Reply
  18. Islandmotivated wrote on :

    look up Stosur it may help

    Reply
  19. CRoberts wrote on :

    Could it be House Work?

    Reply
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