DrupalWomenQ-#8432

I have vertical lines down my nails. They tear from the sides and are not strong. Also they grow slower. I have heard that the lines can be hereditary.

11 Answers

  1. Gyrobob wrote on :

    I have been wheat-free for only a month and a half now, but several folks on the Wheat Belly sites have chimed in saying that after a few months of being totally wheat-free, they have noticed thicker hair and stronger nails. No one can guaranteed the same results for you, but give it a try. Even if it does work, it’ll take a while because nails (and hair) don’t grow very fast. Besides, as with most folks, you’ll realize all kinds of other benefits from being wheat-free.

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  2. Alene Wendrow wrote on :

    My friend just told me yesterday (believe it or not) about Naltique. I bought it on Drugstore.com. She told me it saved her nails. She used it everyday for a week or so, and she has no more vertical lines, peeling, or breaking. I’m giving it a try as soon as it comes. I’ll let you know.

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    • Wendy Brown wrote on :

      Thanks for your reply. I am going to try leaving my nails alone for awhile with the information from some of the other responses, but also would like to hear back from your experience with the Nailtique.

      Reply
    • Alene Wendrow wrote on :

      Just got it in the mail today so I will let you know how it goes. I removed the polish, and they are horrendous!! So, we’ll see…

      Reply
  3. kimrub wrote on :

    Out of curiosity, are they dark lines? A friend of mine had a narrow kind of brownish vertical line down the length of her nail, and it turned out to be a kind of skin cancer. She had to have her entire nail removed permanently, which was pretty lucky since the other choice was amputation. Really, it was very serious. She only took action because she had a relative with a similar thing on a toe nail. Since I had never heard of this, I’m thinking it’s little known; thought I’d mention this possibility.

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    • Wendy Brown wrote on :

      Thank you for your reply. No, they are not. They are faint white, nail color, rather lines. Good to know since I had never heard of the brownish vertical lines on nails.

      Reply
  4. Jo Ann Graham wrote on :

    Hi Joyce,
    While I am not a scientist I can tell you that both my mom (who is 87) and I (age 61) have these lines which developed with age as the doctor’s response indicates. I have always had very soft, tearable, bendable, flaky nails. Here are a few suggestions that helped me:
    1. You might want to check with your doctor to see if you have a slow thyroid condition since that can be one reason for fragile nails. Both my mom and I have that also.
    2. I have tried every kind of nail hardener and conditioner on the market and was horribly frustrated and ashamed of my ugly nails. Then my nail tech suggested putting nothing on my nails — no polish, not even clear, no hardener, nothing. My nails began to improve and within 3 months when they had grown out a new nail, my nails became hard and stopped flaking and peeling. The one or two times I have used polish for a special event, the result is flaky, brittle nails that I have to grow all the way out again.
    3. My nails still tear from the side sometimes but I have discovered that is from the way the nail tech files them leaving a little notch that catches as they grow out. I just don’t let her do that anymore.
    4. I also began taking a glucosamine chondroitin combination with biotin for my joints, that I feel helped some with my nails.
    It is like I have a new set of hands for the first time in my life I can see white on all ten nails and actually have to cut my nails because they get too long. Of all these suggestions I think the “going naked” on my nails was the one that helped the most.
    Good luck.

    Reply
    • CandidaRoyalle wrote on :

      I agree completely with Jo Ann Graham. Back in the mid-‘90’s, after polishing my nails for over 20 years, my once beautiful nails refused to grow any longer. They would peel, split at the edges, they were just were unhappy. So I did the unthinkable: I stopped putting anything on them, other than creams and oils to help them recover. After about a year my nails were once again long and lovely. I discovered “buffing”, whether it was me or the manicurist. And I also learned that leaving them neutral colored actually extends the perceived length of your fingers. The important thing is to also never use nail polish remover. I don’t care if they say certain ones are less abrasive to the nails. Anything that dissolves that nail polish can’t be good for them. When I have a really special event or am being photographed, I simply apply a coat of clear base coat on my nails to give them a little sheen, and then let it wear off by itself. Being neutral it doesn’t show and look like unsightly peeling nail polish. I’m telling you, this is the only way to regain healthy, attractive nails. Leave them alone. Apply creams and oils on your hands, cuticles and nails, and your nails will thank you for it.

      Reply
    • Wendy Brown wrote on :

      Thank you Candida for your reply. I do like the idea of buffing my nails, I have heard it helps to get the nails to grow. I will leave them alone, just push back my cuticles, and then only for the holidays wear neutral polish. I will also use more cream, lotion and cuticle oil.

      Reply
  5. Cynthia Bailey MD wrote on :

    There are hereditary nail syndromes, but age, thyroid, rheumatoid arthritis and harsh nail care products can also cause these changes. It’s probably best to see a dermatologist, or at least your primary care doctor to be certain your nail changes are not the ‘tip of the iceberg’ for some other health issue. If they are not, then I love how effective the simple, regular application of bag balm to helping normalize peeling/splitting nails. Always apply it to nails that just had a nice soak in water (ie after washing hands, bathing, doing the dishes etc). Of course, eat a balanced and healthy diet so you’re fortifying your nails with the vitamins and minerals they need from the inside out. A biotin supplement may also be helpful; there are hair and nail supplements that contain biotin and you can get them at most health food stores. You need to give them about a year before you decide if they have an impact on your nail health.

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  6. Debra Jaliman MD wrote on :

    They often come with age and are like the wrinkling in our skin. If your nails are not strong try taking some biotin you will see a difference in a matter of months, your nails will get thicker and stronger.

    Reply
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