DrupalWomenQ-#9121

Since “Fall is for planting”, I’d love to know what other gardening FOFs are adding to their landscapes this year.

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19 Answers

  1. avonlady wrote on :

    I just planted some deep pink tulips. they were from Safeway and helped support Breast Cancer. Only $1.99 for 10 in the floral section near produce. I planted them in memory of friends and family who have had the disease.

    Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      What a sweet living memorial! Thanks for sharing.
      hugs, Pam

      Reply
  2. Christine Bentley wrote on :

    I live on Long Island, NY and will be adding day lily bulbs when it turns a bit cooler. My gardens are quite packed, so I might just do some rearranging.

    Reply
  3. Merry Richon wrote on :

    Hi,
    Could I add a question to this thread… As someone who has gone from a large space with numerous planting options to window boxes and a few pots on a small Washington, DC balcony, is there something other than pansies to try over the winter? Many thanks for suggestions!
    Merry

    Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      Merry,
      Have you tried small conifers, miniature hollies, etc with a few evergreen groundcovers tucked in here and there? Depending on how sheltered your site is from wind, and the sun exposure in the winter, you may be able to push a zone warmer with your annuals. And, don’t forget to underplant your pansies with tiny spring-flowering bulbs, as long as you have great drainage in the bottom of your pots and window boxes. Happy Fall!

      Reply
    • Merry Richon wrote on :

      Lovely – thanks for the suggestions! It occurred to me to consider cyclamen as a change from pansies – do you think they might survive in the DC climate (I saw them happily ensconced in window boxes in London one winter)? We are relatively well sheltered which is a blessing!

      Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      Merry, I love the florist cyclamen that Londoners use in their winter plantings, but these flowers are probably too tender for your site.
      You could grow hardy cyclamen, C. hederifolium, in DC. Just keep the snow cover off if snow lasts more than a few days, and provide excellent drainage. For more info about cyclamen see either http://www.cyclamen.org, the website for The Cyclamen Society, or http://www.hardycyclamens.com. Good luck!

      Reply
    • Merry Richon wrote on :

      Terrific – thanks for the comments and links. I think I have plenty of ideas to work with now in my micro-space!!

      Reply
  4. Hawklady wrote on :

    I am planting Cyclamen, violas, phlox and pansies. I will plant some bulbs later. I live in No. Calif (zone 8). It would be helpful to know what zone others are gardening in.

    Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      I live in the Southeast, smack in the middle of the piedmont of North Carolina, in a transitional Zone 7-8, with clay-based soils, plentiful rain (this year), where I can plant woody ornamentals from now until about March. After that, it is only veggies, annuals, and perennials until Fall.
      So, now I am busy installing fruit trees, shrubs, perennials, grasses, and some spring bulbs.
      Glad to hear that so many of my FOF gardening sisters are back out in the landscape.

      Reply
    • Hawklady wrote on :

      Thanks Greenwoman. Knowing your zone and soil conditions is very helpful. My soil conditions are very similar. I have added a lot of compost over time and that has been helpful. Don’t have as much space as I would like so must be judicious in what I plan and plant. Happy growing.

      Reply
  5. Corinne Garrett wrote on :

    Marigolds in yellow and orange for the planters out front on the porch along with crotons with colors of the season. Goes with the terra-cotta jack o’lantern wonderfully. A new yellow Angel Trumpet will go in next to the pink one. I also have geraniums this time of year in FL – it’s cooler and they flourish, along with Impatiens in the shade beds until the first frost. I am always adding to herb garden – except for the mint and rosemary: both of which I am overrun with.

    Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      I’d love to see a photo of your fall decorations! They sound magazine worthy.
      Have you had success with Lemon Verbena in Florida?

      Reply
  6. Rebecca Carpenter wrote on :

    Bulbs, bulbs, bulbs for early spring through early summer flowers. I’ll plant more summer bulbs later, as well as some more roses. Also adding a couple of fruit trees, some gardenias, crepe myrtles and Rose of Sharon (Altheas). I love the traditional flowers of the Deep South! Have to decide what else to plant for butterflies!

    Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      Thank you for sharing your busy Fall planting plans.
      The late Dr J C Raulston, from NCSU, advised that Chinese Abelia were better butterfly magnets than Butterfly bushes, and I have found that is true in my own North Carolina garden. Hope that helps.

      Reply
  7. melissa soucy wrote on :

    Hello,
    I am planting more fruit trees and some viburnum bushes this fall.
    I have also put in more blubs and plants that I got a Lowes for 75% off.
    Happy Fall,
    melissa

    Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      Don’t you love Viburnum? Many of mine are repeat blooming this Fall. Plus, the birds enjoy the berries. Happy Fall to you, too!

      Reply
    • melissa soucy wrote on :

      I just planted one name escapes me but it has beautiful dark blue berries in the fall and the leaves are jsut beautiful fight now.
      Oh yes I live in zone 7 MD and zone 5 PA I’m in PA more than MD now.
      I am hoping to plant a beauty berry this spring they just spread and need to be kept in check.
      Calling for fluries here in PA Sun UGH way to early still gardening left to do

      Reply
    • Greenwoman wrote on :

      Your viburnum with the blue berries is probably an Arrowwood, Viburnum dentatum. There is a really nice selection named ‘Blue Muffin’, which is available through ProvenWinners.
      I have found in my own North Carolina garden that the native American Beautyberry, Callicarpa americana, is less promiscuous, therefore less invasive, than the Japanese Beautyberry, C. japonica.
      Early snow! And, I thought I had a lot of gardening to squeeze in this Saturday with our nightime temps dropping into the 40’s. Good luck!

      Reply
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