Introducing A New Kind Of Book Club

  • Get inspired to read more.
  • Discover great books.
  • Connect with other readers.
  • Meet the authors for Q&As through Facebook Live!

As a busy FabOverFifty woman, finding time to read is not always easy—and finding a good book can be even harder. Yet reading is one of life’s true joys! We’re launching this Spread the Words book club in partnership with Early Bird Books to inspire you to read more. We’ll save you the time it takes to research and find your next great book. And we’ll connect you with other women reading the same book—so you can get more out of your reading experience and share your thoughts, observations, and questions. We’ll also introduce you to the author, who will host a Facebook Live chat at the end of each month, where you can hear his or her personal insights and inspiration—and even ask your own questions.

How It Works

     1.  We’ll choose a great book each month.
     2.  You’ll read the book.
     3.  We’ll launch a Facebook page so you can connect with other book club members.

     4.  The author will host a Facebook Live event, where you can ask questions and directly connect with him or her!

The second book we’ll be reading is Home in the Morning, by Mary Glickman.  Mary will host a Facebook Live event on Thursday, November 1st at 6:30 pm EST.

About Home in the Morning

A Southern family confronts the socially and politically tumultuous 1960s, and the secrets that bind its members together, in a novel by National Jewish Book Award finalist Mary Glickman. Jackson Sassaport is a man who often finds himself in the middle. Whether torn between Stella, his beloved and opinionated Yankee wife, and Katherine Marie, the African American girl who first stole his teenage heart; or between standing up for his beliefs and acquiescing to the wishes of his prominent Jewish family to not stand out in the segregated South, Jackson learns to balance the secrets and deceptions of those around him. But one fateful night in 1960 will make the man in the middle reconsider his obligations to propriety and family, and will start a chain of events that will forever change his life and the lives of those around him.

Home in the Morning follows Jackson’s journey from his childhood as a coddled son of the Old South to his struggle as a young man eager to find his place in the civil rights movement while protecting his family. Moving between Jackson’s youth and his adult life as a successful lawyer, Mary Glickman’s riveting novel traces the ways that race and prejudice, family and love intertwine to shape our lives. This ebook features rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

Meet Mary Gilckman

Born on the south shore of Boston, Mary Glickman studied at the Université de Lyon and Boston University. While she was raised in a strict Irish-Polish Catholic family, from an early age Glickman felt an affinity toward Judaism and converted to the faith when she married. After living in Boston for 20 years, she and her husband traveled to South Carolina and discovered a love for all things southern. Glickman now lives in Seabrook Island, South Carolina, with her husband, cat, and until recently, her beloved horse, King of Harts, of blessed memory. Home in the Morning, her first novel, has been optioned for film by Jim Kohlberg, director of The Music Never Stopped (Sundance 2011), and her second, One More River, was a 2011 National Jewish Book Award Finalist in Fiction. Her other novels include An Undisturbed Peace and Marching to Zion.

Concepts to ponder while you’re reading Home in the Morning

  1. Mary Glickman states that “typical Yankee provincialism” inspired her to write Home in the Morning. What do you think she meant by this?
  2. The central character, Jackson Sassaport, is a Southern Jew raised by an authoritarian physician father and an eccentric, stubborn mother in a small town outside Jackson, Mississippi. He’s described as good and humane, yet tone deaf, to the sufferings of the African Americans around him. Why do you think Mary made him the heart of Home in the Morning?
  3. It’s clear from early on that Jackson has strong feelings for Katherine Marie, a poor local African American girl. What does his relationship with her represent?
  4. Jackson’s life is in many ways a struggle to please three very different women: his traditional Southern Jewish mother, his outspoken Jewish wife from the North, and Katherine Marie, his more reserved childhood friend and lifelong love. What does this triumvirate represent?
  5. One of the great themes of Mary’s personal life is transformation and conversion: She converted from Catholicism to Judaism, and moved from the North to the South. How do you think this theme affected and informed Home in the Morning?
  6. Home in the Morning centers on a Southern Jewish family on the cusp of the civil rights movement. What do you think Mary is saying about the difference between Southern and Northern Jews?
  7. Spirituality is a strong part of Mary’s identity and personal journey. How do you see this reflected in her prose?
  8. The civil rights movement operates as the main backdrop of Home in the Morning. Why do you think Mary chose this time period and what about it resonates in today’s world?

**By joining Spread The Words book club, you agree to receive emails from FabOverFifty and Early Bird Books**


Read Home in the Morning on ANY device. Your laptop. Smart phone. iPad. That’s right. On ANY device!  Early Bird Books is so excited about launching Spread The Words with FabOverFifty, it’s inviting you to download Mary’s game-changing novel for less than a cup of coffee!
  • carolyn cartner

    I love to read books but it has to be noboring by a autour that i like and up to date

    • Mary Glickman

      But how do you know you don’t like an author til you try ’em, Carolyn? Give Home in the Morning a try. It’s been called many things, but I don’t recall anyone saying it was boring! 😉

    • Geri Brin

      Hi Carolyn,
      I’m reading Home In The Morning and it’s marvelous. You will love it.

      Geri Brin, FabOverFifty