Love thy neighbors, and their baby, too

How cute is this baby!

Kristin and Conrad, a newly married couple, moved into the apartment across the hall from us about a year ago.  They have a gorgeous and sweet Labrador, Hanna, and are expecting a baby boy in November.

I ran into Conrad yesterday while we were walking our respective dogs and he told me he and Kristin are interviewing pediatricians and getting the nursery ready for their baby.  I’m not sure how old Conrad is, but I guess early forties.  His excitement was palpable.

When David told me Kristin was pregnant, I thought it would be nice to offer my babysitting services, which is just what I told Conrad yesterday. “Please feel free to call me if you and Kristin want to go out for the evening. I will grab my iPad and sit in your place as easily as I do in my own,” I told him.

Although I’m not chomping at the bit to be a grandmother quite yet, I am in favor of perpetuating the human race.  And I do like to be generous to my neighbors. Kristin and Conrad’s apartment isn’t humongous and they’re surely going to want a night out alone sooner rather than later. I’m certain the baby will cry the entire time I’m babysitting and I’ll have to hold him for three hours straight, but hey, I get to go home—alone —at some point.

Conrad seemed genuinely pleased by my offer. It really is fun to make good people happy, and usually so easy. It’s something I try to do as often as possible.

6 Responses to “Love thy neighbors, and their baby, too”

  1. Helen says:

    It’s great to help out new parents. Those of us who are not grandma’s yet, and are looking forward to the day, can practice with the neighbors, it’s a win-win!

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  2. Kristin says:

    While I am happily done having my own babies and am doing my best to simply survive the most delightful teen years, I do like me a baby and having one to sort of chomp on and smell and sit with for a few hours is not a bad way to spend an evening!

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    • Geri says:

      Hi Kristin.

      Well said. For sure!

      G

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  3. Toby Wollin says:

    Yep, new parents have noooo idea what their lives will be like after the birth of that cute little image on the sonagram image. And if Conrad and his wife are like my sister and BIL who had their one-and-only later in life, they will be calling on your services sooner than later. Do them a huge favor once the baby arrives and everyone is home and going nuts about diapering, or getting the whole breast feeding thing to actually work, and so on, which is to tell them that babies do not break and that if the baby cries, he or she will not grow up to be Ted Bundy. Also, I found my pediatrician became a whole different human being between my Baby Number One and Baby Number Two. For Baby Number One, he was strict, nothing but the breast, no water in a bottle, feeding on demand (Ach tung!). Much more flexible with Baby Number Two. The difference? He got married and he and his wife had a baby of their own — all of a sudden, feeding on demand was not so hard and fast for Mommy. So, a decent and credible question for finding a pediatrician is: Do you have kids of your own? Did you get up at night with them? What did YOU do about projective vomiting?”

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    • Geri says:

      Hi Toby,

      Great advice. I wrote a cover story for New York Magazine 30 years ago on how to find a pediatrician. That would have a great question to ask a doc.

      oxo G.

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  4. LPC says:

    I think it’s important that we, the older women who’ve been through it all, reach out and help the younger generation bring up their children. However we do it.

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