{Giveaway} Dazzling Button Jewelry

—————————————————————————————————

FOF Susan Davis is giving away one of her handmade, antique pieces of jewelry to one lucky winner. Enter to win by answering in the comments below: Which of these three pieces of jewelry would you most like to win:  the All That Jazz Bracelet/Necklace, Bronze Button and Abalone Watch, or Classical Trio Necklace.

Susan Davis was working in public relations for seven years in Baton Rouge when she and her husband decided to move to South Louisiana and become farmers on her family’s farm. “I found out I hated it,” says Susan. “So, I started looking for a craft that I could do.”

One afternoon in 1985, Susan was spending time with her grandmother who lived next door. Susan was rummaging through her grandmother’s button collection, when she was struck with a great idea. “I said ‘Grandma, these would make great earrings!’ She gave me all 30 boxes [of buttons], and I got to work.”

Susan started selling her jewelry line, Grandmother’s Buttons, at local craft fairs that same year. Within a year, she began selling at antique shows. “It was really fun,” says Susan. “After seven years of having a professional job, I had a gypsy lifestyle for about a year just going to shows and setting up on weekends.”

In 1995, Susan and her husband purchased and restored a historic 20th century bank building in St. Francisville, Louisiana, and turned it into a button museum, with a retail store for Grandmother’s Buttons on the first floor. “We have buttons from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries” says Susan. All of the pieces feature buttons made before the 1960s with the exception of some earring sets (made specifically to match certain necklaces). “Many are warehouse finds,” says Susan. “We’ll visit an old factory and buy all of their remains.”

Grandmother’s Buttons jewelry is now sold in over 800 retail stores throughout the U.S., Canada, parts of Europe, and even Shanghai. All of Susan’s pieces are handcrafted, either by Susan herself or by one of her ten team members. Susan estimates she sells about 25 to 35 thousand pieces of jewelry per year on average.

“What I hear the most from our customers is that every time they wear a piece from Grandmother’s Buttons, people ask them about it,” says Susan.  “Customers love the feeling of uniqueness that gives them. We treat the buttons like little gems, setting them in the jewelry just as if they were semi-precious stones. We’re extra vigilant about our quality because our pieces are often worn by their owners for decades!”

Enter to win a handmade, antique piece of jewelry from Grandmother’s Buttons by answering in the comments below: Which of these three pieces of jewelry would you most like to win: the All That Jazz Bracelet/Necklace, Bronze Button and Abalone Watch, or Classical Trio Necklace.

One FOF will win. (See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes October 1st, 2012 at midnight E.S.T.

from →  

{Foxcroft Style Challenge Part One} And the winner is…

Last month, we sent five FOF style gurus a Foxcroft Non-Iron Tunic and invited them to take the Foxcroft Style Challenge. Each guru styled the shirt in her own, unique way. Then, we asked you to vote and tell us: who wore it best?

The polls are closed and the votes have been tallied. The winner is….

Lovey Dash
Beverly Hills-based stylist, formerly in VIP sales for Louis Vuitton on Rodeo Drive.

Tell us about how you styled your shirt.
I styled it [on my friend] with a pair of Isabel Marant fringed leggings, a fun hat, a cross-over, iridescent Chanel bag and boots, and an AllSaints charm belt. As always, I added lots of fun things on her wrists.

What made you choose to style it this way?
This kind of look [a long shirt over leggings] is a basic uniform look for me. It’s so easy to put together, hides a multitude of sins and is comfy and timeless.

Where could you envision wearing an outfit like this?
Shopping, the movies or meeting the girls for lunch. For a casual business meeting, I’d lose the hat.


Don’t forget to vote on this month’s style challenge and visit FoxcroftCollection.com. In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month take 20% off any pink shirt. Can’t be combined with another offer. Shop now.

{Foxcroft Style Challenge Part Two} Who wore it best?


—————————————————————————————————

Our Foxcroft Style Challenge from last month was so popular…we did it again! This time, we sent five FOF Style Gurus a Foxcroft Grosgrain Ribbon Tunic. Each guru styled the shirt in her own, unique way. Now, tell us: who wore it best?

When you vote for who wore it best AND leave a comment HERE telling us your favorite item from Foxcroft’s new arrivals, you’ll automatically be entered to win the stunning Foxcroft shirt featured in this challenge!

P.S. Meet last month’s Foxcroft Style Challenge Winner, Lovey Dash.

And for an extra chance to win: “Like” Foxcroft on Facebook and “Follow” the brand on Pinterest.

—————————————————————————————————

Zipporah Sandler
Florida-based lifestyle specialist behind the brilliant blog, Champagne Living.

What did you think of the shirt?
The fit was extremely generous, it covered my sins (tummy and thighs), was long enough to wear with leggings, and easy to use to create so many different looks.

Tell us about how you styled your shirt. What other pieces did you pair with it?
I simply tossed it over a short black skirt, added a wide scarf around the waist that I cinched with a belt and added a black men’s style vest, and a pair of black wedges.

What made you choose to style it this way?
I’m a scarf girl. You rarely see me walk out of the house without something draped around my neck or shoulders. Given the length of this shirt, I thought it was perfect for a cumberbun, and simply tied one of my many large scarves around the waist to give it a casual, fun feel. I was going for a marriage of 80s Diane Keaton with today’s accessories.

Where could you envision wearing an outfit like this?
I’d wear this everyday!

—————————————————————————————————

Sherrie Mathieson
Phoenix-based leading style expert and Random House author of Steal this Style and Forever Cool.

What did you think of the shirt?
It fit very well, and I like white shirts as staples.

Tell us about how you styled your shirt.
I took color directive from the shirt’s brown ribbon and went for a soft neutral palette–brown, camel and pale gray. I paired it with items that I felt would add textural interest–a chunky, tortoise Hermes necklace, a Brunello Cucinelli sheer elephant grey shawl and a Chanel cuff with a gray and brown swirl pattern. The silk and wool Prada ankle-length slacks in camel were in good proportion with the long shirt. The Chanel wood platform shoes have a gray, brown and tan leather band which is harmonious with the Chanel dark brown, soft, leather shoulder bag. The Oliver People’s aviator glasses give a sportier stamp to the outfit –and I think help neutralize any ladylike outfit (something I believe can be aging).

Where could you envision wearing an outfit like this?
To any activity or event where I want a somewhat dressy casual look. This could apply to working with a client, luncheons, and so on.

—————————————————————————————————

Phyllis Lampkin
Philadelphia-based fashion and image consultant, model, and television show host. She is also the creator of the website Forever Young & Fresh.

What did you think of the shirt?
It was absolutely lovely, a little snug in the chest, but lovely!

Tell us about how you styled your shirt. What other pieces did you pair with it?
I always wear scarves. They’re one of my favorite accessories. The scarf I am wearing here is not a brand label–just a wonderful piece my best friend Delores gave to me.

—————————————————————————————————

Kara Allan
Virginia-based style and image consultant.

What did you think of the shirt?
It fit pretty well, and white is standard.

Tell us about how you styled your shirt. What other pieces did you pair with it?
Jeans and heels.

What made you choose to style it this way?
I don’t wear button-down shirts with suits–just jeans.

Where could you envision wearing an outfit like this?
To the movies, shopping, low-key activities.

—————————————————————————————————

Bonnie Morrison
South Carolina-based fashion enthusiast

—————————————————————————————————

Don’t forget to enter to win the stunning Foxcroft shirt featured in this challenge by voting and leaving a comment HERE telling us your favorite item from Foxcroft’s new arrivals. One vote per person.

For an extra chance to win: “Like” Foxcroft on Facebook and “Follow” the brand on Pinterest.

Liked this challenge? Stay tuned for a new Foxcroft Style Challenge every month. In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month take 20% any pink shirt. Can’t be combined with another offer. Shop now.

—————————————————————————————————

One FOF will win. (See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes October 11, 2012 at midnight E.S.T. Winners will be announced October 18, 2012.

{Foxcroft Style Challenge} Who wore it best?

—————————————————————————————————

We sent five FOF Style Gurus a Foxcroft Non-Iron Tunic (recently featured in the September issue of O, The Oprah Magazine) and invited them to take the Foxcroft Style Challenge. Each guru styled the shirt in her own, unique way. Now, tell us: who wore it best?

When you vote for who wore it best and leave a comment below telling us which color tunic you like the best, you’ll automatically be entered to win the stunning Foxcroft shirt featured in this challenge (in the color of your choice)!

And for an extra chance to win: “Like” Foxcroft on Facebook and “Follow” the brand on Pinterest

—————————————————————————————————

Susan Grant
Merchandise manager for Muse, a full-service jewelry showroom.

—————————————————————————————————

Ellen Hart
Founder of Careerbags.com.

—————————————————————————————————

Susan Sommers
A personal stylist with 25 years experience in the fashion industry and founder of Dresszing.

—————————————————————————————————

Lovey Dash
Beverly Hills-based stylist, formerly in VIP sales for Louis Vuitton on Rodeo Drive.

—————————————————————————————————

Glenyse Thompson
A personal home and wardrobe stylist and the creator of Styleosophy.

—————————————————————————————————

Who wore it best?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

For more details on how the gurus styled their shirts read their entire interviews, here.

Don’t forget to enter to win the stunning Foxcroft shirt featured in this challenge by voting and leaving a comment below telling us which color you like the best.

For an extra chance to win: “Like” Foxcroft on Facebook and “Follow” the brand on Pinterest.

.
Liked this challenge? Stay tuned for a new Foxcroft Style Challenge every month. For 20% off your first Foxcroft online order, use code “FOXFOF20” at checkout. One per order. Can’t be combined with another offer. Shop now.

—————————————————————————————————
One FOF will win. (See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes September 13, 2012 at midnight E.S.T. Winners will be announced September 20, 2012.

{Giveaway} Strongest Minds “Hope in a Soap”


—————————————————————————————————
FOF Amy Cohen is giving away ten of her “Hope in a Soap” homemade soaps, made with flower essences in six different “attitudes.” Enter to win by answering this question in the comments below: Which attitude soap would you most like to win?

Amy Cohen first realized the power of flower essences in 2004, when she was going through a hard time in her life. “My father had gotten sick and I had to take care of him,” says Amy. “It was hugely traumatic. I called up my doctor, a believer in alternative medicine, and she sent me flower essence.” Amy was skeptical at first, but the essence actually started working. “The next thing I knew, I was making decisions for my father, and felt that I was in total control.”

Amy wanted to bring others the same relief she felt from flower essences, so she set out to learn everything she could about how they worked. “Each botanical extract has an emotional purpose for healing,” Amy explains. “So, from a flower, a remedy is made–a botanical extract that you add to water.” In 2005, Amy enrolled in the NY School of Homeopathy, which offers the only four-year program of this particular study of alternative medicine. She traveled to Mount Vernon, England, that same year, and earned her level 3 practitioner certification from the prestigious Bach Centre, founded by Dr. Edward Bach, one of the first doctors to study the benefits of flower remedies in the 1930s. Recently, she became a certified teacher of Australian Bush Flower Essences while studying in Australia.

Starting in 2006, Amy treated patients in her home, using her expertise to create unique flower essence blends. “I’ve worked with many many children with autism and helped many women through menopause,” says Amy. “That’s how dynamic making a customized blend can be.”

This year, Amy launched her line of homemade soaps made out of the flower essences she’s studied for years, aptly called “Hope In a Soap.” Her soaps come in six different “attitudes,” from “Chill Out!” for those who need some help taking it easy, to “Out-Rage!” for anyone who feels like they’re on edge. She’s already received a ton of positive feedback from her clients.

“The customized blends I make truly change the people I treat,” says Amy. “Through the use of flower remedies, they move back into balance, lose their fears, and create their success.”

Enter to win one of Amy’s “Hope in a Soaps” by answering this question in the comments below:  Which attitude soap would you most like to win?

—————————————————————————————————

Ten FOFs will win. (See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes August 30, 2012 at midnight E.S.T.

from →  

{Parenting} How to survive sending your kids to college.

—————————————————————————————————

Sending your kid to college this fall? Tammy, Stacy and Felicia, the FOFs behind the clever online community, Uncool College Parents know how you feel. Last year, the trio, who all have college kids of their own, started their website as a place for parents to gather and swap information and advice. Here, they school us on financing a college education, speaking to your coed-to-be about drinking and campus safety, and quelling your own pre-empty-nest jitters.

What is Uncool College Parents?
An online community for parents sending their kids to college. We seek to provide information and a place for parents to come together over this [common] experience.

Why is it important to have a community like this?
When you have a child going through elementary school and high school you have a community [the parents of your children’s friends] that you can talk with. When your kids go to college, you may not be sure where to go. You might go to the web, but we felt there wasn’t a place that was from real parents. So, we created one.

Tell me a little about yourselves.
The three of us are all busy wives, mothers and professionals.

Are all your children in college?
Tammy: My oldest daughter is going to be a freshman this fall and I have a younger daughter.
Stacy: I have two children, both in college. One of my children transferred so I have that issue under my belt.
Felicia: I have one son that graduated from college who went to a school in a major city. I have another son who is attending a college in a rural area.

Do college websites have communities for parents to communicate?
Many colleges have parent websites. They are important sources of information. They give the official message to parents. We’re giving the unofficial message to parents–the way things really are.

What are some examples of topics you’ve written about?
Everything from ‘how do you help your kids decorate their dorm room,” to the more serious issue like drinking on campus. We cover it all.

What’s been the most popular topic you’ve blogged about?
Finance. People are wondering, is college worth it? Are their children choosing majors where there will be jobs? We wrote a blog on how to keep college costs down with suggestions including keeping your child under your health insurance and enrolling in the least expensive food plan.

Should you give your kids spending money?
Each family has to figure that out on their own. Some can afford to, some can’t. One idea is to give your children a bi-weekly allowance instead of monthly–the same way people get salaries. This way, you are teaching them a life lesson. We also wrote a blog post, about this.

What are some other websites you recommend that are great resources for parents and their kids going to colleges?
Felicia wrote a great post about textbooks and included sites where you can buy them for less than the college bookstore such as Chegg.com and Half.com. We also wrote a post about RateMyProfessor.com, a site where students review professors.

How do you talk to your kids about important issues, like campus security, without sounding preachy?
When my daughter was going to college, I told her to call me when she was walking to class alone. In some ways, it felt like I was walking her to class. It’s hard, sometimes you get that eye roll from your child, but, even if you don’t think that they hear you, they hear you.

Should your child join a fraternity or sorority?
Greek life is more important or less important depending on the college. It also depends if your child is interested in that and if they can get into the house they want to. Hopefully your kid is going to make the decision that is right for them, and if they allow you into the process you can help them make the decision.

What if your child has an awful roommate? Is it appropriate to call the school?
Your first action should be to let your child deal–that’s part of them learning how to advocate for themselves. Learning how to live with a stranger and to compromise are good life skills. If safety and security is an issue that’s a different story, then it might be time to get involved.

If your child gets sick at school should you go?
It depends. If your kid has the sniffles, that might be a time to say ‘you can handle this.’ There are some more pressing health issues that even an adult would like a little back up, and certainly a college kid could not be expected to handle on their own. A parent might absolutely want to jump in.

Is it normal to feel sad or depressed when your child leaves for college the first year? What about every year after that?
Certainly, the first time is the hardest. Every time you disconnect after that, it gets a little bit easier. As a parent, when you see your child really taking care of things on their own, that’s when you feel you’re doing something right. Try not to look as it as a loss, but instead, an opportunity to do things you love again.

from →  

{Giveaway} Isabelle K Clip On Earrings


—————————————————————————————————

FOF Isabelle K is giving away this exquisite pair of clip-on earrings from her collection, made out of Swarovski crystal rondelles and glass pearls (retail value: $475.00). Enter to win by answering this question in the comments below: What would you wear with this pair of earrings?

When Paris native Isabelle Krupnick first came to the U.S. she owned her own clothing store, and worked on Los Angeles’s prestigious Rodeo Drive selling French costume jewelry. After moving to Virginia Beach with her husband to raise a family, she wanted to keep herself occupied and continue working in fashion and jewelry. “When I would walk around [in Virginia Beach], people would stop me all the time and say, ‘Oh my god, where did you get that?’ [about her French accessories]. After a few months I said, ‘Okay, I’m going to go to Paris, buy some jewelry, and start a business.”

And with that, Isabelle started bringing the luxury of Parisian jewelry to her friends in Virginia. She started by selling jewelry out of her home, then held jewelry parties for her friends, and later, attended trade shows to sell her pieces.  Two years ago, she launched IsabelleK.com in order to reach more of her customers.  “I travel so much and do so many shows out of town that I have clientele everywhere,” says Isabelle.

Isabelle has since expanded her collections to include jewelry from Italy, England, Spain, and even a few pieces from the U.S. “American designers make great semi-precious stones, while Europeans make beautiful costume jewelry with rhinestones,” Isabelle explains. “I needed a balance between the two [for my collection], so I went to the American market for my semi-precious stones.”

One trend that has become a staple in Isabelle’s collections are clip-on earrings.  “In France, all the elegant statement earrings are clip-ons, because they look better that way,” says Isabelle. “You don’t want your earlobe to be pulling down to your shoulder. The clip-on makes it look elegant.”

The designers that Isabelle worked with for 24 years, now, even create their pieces with her taste in mind. “They know me, they know what I like,” says Isabelle. “I often preview the collection before they even show it. I give them feedback, and they redesign features for me.”  Some of these designs have been worn by celebrities, on runways, and featured in magazines such as Elle, Vogue, InStyle, W, and Allure.

“My clients trust me because they know I want them to look good. My best advertisements are my best customers,” says Isabelle. “I’m constantly looking for new designers, reading magazines and always researching what is new. I think when you have a passion for what you do, it’s easy.”

Enter to win this exquisite pair of clip-on earrings from Isabelle K by answering this question in the comments below: What would you wear with this pair of earrings?

—————————————————————————————————

One FOF will win. (See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes August 16th, 2012 at midnight E.S.T.

from →  

{Giveaway} Win a Piece of Jewelry from Foxy Originals

Win a fabulous piece of jewelry from Foxy Originals, a unique and vibrant line of high quality jewelry at affordable prices. Enter to win by becoming a fan of FabOverFifty and a fan of Foxy Originals on Facebook, then answer this question in the comments below: Which Foxy Originals piece would you most like to win?

—————————————————————————————————
(See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes July 30th, 2012 at midnight E.S.T.

from →  

{Family} How Long Should your Adult Children Live at Home?

—————————————————————————————————

“Would love a suggestion on how to deal with adult children living at home,” wrote in one FOF, and we are pretty sure she’s not the only one looking for answers. An unstable job market has led to the rise of what has been dubbed as the Boomerang Generation, the era of kids who return home after college. The U.S. Census Bureau reported a 5% increase in the number of young men (ages 24-34) and 8% increase in the number of young women living with their parents for the period between 2005 and 2011.

So, what’s an FOF to do? We chatted with Christina Newberry, author of  “The Hands-On Guide to Adult Children Living at Home” to get some answers. Here, she offers advice on how long your adult children should live at home (her answer may surprise you!), how to adapt your parenting style to this situation, and the best exit strategy to help your child gain independence and for you to reclaim that empty nest–once and for all.

Enter to win a copy of her book by answering this question in the comments below: how long did your adult children live at home?

—————————————————————————————————

Can you offer five basic tips for dealing with your adult child living at home?

  • Have a plan. One of the biggest sources of conflict are the different expectations in terms of behavior, rent, and family dynamics. Have a conversation about expectations, and put together a contract that everyone agrees to.
  • Be really aware of the financial consequences. There’s a perception that when an adult child moves back home it won’t cost anything, because their old room is empty–it’s just not true. There are financial consequences in terms of food, gas, electricity, and more. It’s important to figure this out together and decide how the family is going to deal with them.
  • Set a timeline on how long your child is going to stay at home and have a plan on how they can work towards independence.
  • You can’t parent adult children and young children the same way. You can’t just take up parenting where you left off. That whole ‘I’m your mother and I said so’ doesn’t work anymore. If they’re living in your house, you absolutely have the right to set guidelines, but it needs to be done in a way that acknowledges your child is now an adult.
  • Remember to take care of yourself and your own relationship with your spouse or partner. That relationship can really suffer when there’s an adult child living at home–especially if the parent is the child’s stepparent, they can end up feeling squeezed out.

How long should you allow your adult child to live at home?
It should be based on why the adult child is moving home. Once you know the reason, you can think about a reasonable amount of time for the adult child. When an adult child is home after college and needs a time to get established, the guideline that I use is up to a year and a half. If it goes beyond two years, it’s become a permanent living situation. The parents and the adult child [then] need to re-evaluate why the adult child is still there. Re-focus on the fact that the adult child should be attempting to become independent, and figure out a way to make that happen.

What if your adult child has always lived at home? How do you establish rules and create an exit strategy for them?
In some ways [this is] easier, since the relationship evolved slowly rather than with the shock of an adult child returning home who has developed habits and [is] used to living independently. The family should still have a meeting–the challenge is figuring out when it is appropriate [to have the meeting]. For some families it may be as soon as the child graduates from high school, while for others it may be after college graduation. But other than the timing of the meeting, all the strategies stay the same.

How can you get your adult child to pitch in around the house without turning it into a fight?
Talk about the impacts of their living at home so that they understand that it’s impacting their parents lives. Once they understand that, they have a better sense of why they’re being expected to help. Adult children living at home often don’t understand that they [may be] causing their parents stress and unhappiness. Parents can be more honest about what their needs are, [and] that keeping the household running is part of their [child’s] responsibility as an adult.

What rules or boundaries  should be set regarding your adult child having their significant other over?
Unless the parents have serious concerns about that person, I think it would be unreasonable [for them] to say that this person couldn’t come over during the day. As far as staying overnight, that’s a call that the parents have to make. It’s not reasonable for adult children to expect their parents to allow them to have their boyfriend or girlfriend stay over if it’s not something that the parents are comfortable with.

How can a parent allow their adult child to feel more free to live his or her life while they’re still living at home?
[By] understanding the difference [between] rules for your house and rules for your child’s life. The parent is in charge of their house, and it’s their responsibility to put rules in place to make [the parents] feel more comfortable. [Whether] the adult child is paying rent, whether or not they have a curfew–those are house rules. When it comes to life rules, that’s when the parent needs to let the adult child figure things out on their own. The parent can say the boyfriend or girlfriend can’t stay over, but it’s not reasonable for the parent to tell the adult child that they’re not allowed to stay over at their boyfriend or girlfriend’s house, because that’s something in terms of the adult child making their own life decisions.

How can you help your adult child choose a career path without being too pushy?
You should not be giving advice unless it’s asked for. Parents can end up causing problems when they’re just trying to help. It’s becoming more common for parents to do things like write their kid’s resume or call potential employers on their child’s behalf, [and] that is just an absolute no-no. You need to let your adult child figure out a career path on their own. [The parents may] have some contacts that they would be able to put their child in touch with, but they shouldn’t call those contact on their child’s behalf. [But] there’s nothing wrong with suggesting that their adult child give one of their contacts a call.

Is it possible to teach your adult child to budget and save while they’re living under your roof?
An adult child living at home should pay rent in virtually all cases. Obviously it’s not going to be market rent, but the adult child should have some kind of payment. It gets them in the habit of knowing that they’re going to have a monthly payment once they’re paying for their own living expenses. In some cases, adult children living at home have no income coming in whatsoever, [but] there should be something equivalent to rent that the adult child physically earns through labor around the house. It’s a good idea for parents to sit down with their adult kids and figure out a budget, so that they really understand how much money they need to afford living independently.

What can you do if you find illegal drugs in your adult child’s room?
If it bothers you that it’s in your house, but you’re not concerned that it’s going to have a major impact on your child’s life, make a point that it’s not acceptable. If it’s a more serious kind of situation where you’re worried for your child’s safety, you may need to get help from someone in your area who has expertise and can help you come up with a strategy to fit your situation. Keep in mind that if you do get the police involved, you can’t undo that decision, so you need to think about this before you do it.

What if you don’t want to kick your adult child out but they constantly lie and are disrespectful?
Sit down with your adult child and explain that you don’t have to let them be there. It’s important to make the adult child aware that once they reach a certain age, that [your] responsibility of having to take care of them isn’t there anymore, and [that the parents] are letting the adult child live at home just because they love the adult child. If the adult child has behavior issues that are causing the parent to be uncomfortable, then maybe [the parents] should think of ways they could help that child without them living in their home.

What resources can you give your adult child to make the move out process as simple and safe as possible?
While not all adult children will move out, there often comes a time when moving out is the best possible situation for both you and your adult child. If this is the case for you, there are many ways that you can assist your child in smoothly transitioning to their own living space. When it comes to locating an apartment, let your child take the lead on starting the search, as this is their first step in becoming independent. It’s ok to offer your help, though. Try suggesting apartment search tools like MyApartmentMap or PadMapper. If your child decides to conduct their search another way, that is perfectly fine, as well. Another resource that may be worth suggesting is a tenant screening service like SmartMove. As your child submits rental applications, they will most likely need to provide private financial information before getting approved. Make sure they are doing this in the safest way possible by using an approved and secure tenant screening service. It’s important to remember that as they make the move out of your house, you should offer support in any way that you can while still allowing them to be autonomous in this new chapter of their life.

—————————————————————————————————

.
.
.
.
Enter to win a free copy of Christina Newberry’s book, “The Hands-On Guide to Adult Children Living at Home,” by answering this question in the comment section below: How long did your adult children live at home?

One FOF will win. (See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes July 5th, 2012 at midnight E.S.T.

{Giveaway} Win a $75 gift card to Shabby Apple clothing

Win a $75 dollar gift card to Shabby Apple, a website featuring 50s inspired pieces with silhouettes that flatter your FOFigure without showing too much skin. Enter to win by becoming a fan of FabOverFifty and a fan of Shabby Apple, then answer this question in the comments below: Which Shabby Apple dress is your favorite?

—————————————————————————————————
(See all our past winners, here.) (See official rules, here.) Contest closes June 28th, 2012 at midnight E.S.T.

from →