DrupalWomenQ-#6302

What’s the best way to weave loose ends into my knitting so that they don’t eventually come loose? I feel like mine always end up coming out . . .

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19 Answers

  1. Melissa Gaddy wrote on :

    I favor the idea of splitting the yarn and weaving into the finished product where it is less noticeable.

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  2. Mimi Berger wrote on :

    My sister recommends splitting the yarn, then weaving each strand separately.

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  3. Mildred Hayden wrote on :

    split the yarn and weave the 2 strands in seprately. This does reduce the tendance for the ends to pull back out and they are even less visible in the knitted garment. And if you leave 8″ to weave in the then cut the tail after weaving, it makes the process easier.

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  4. Judy Owens wrote on :

    The first thing to do is to make sure when you add additional yarn that you cross over the new yarn to secure it. after that leave about 2 inches and either weave in the back, using a croc hook or weave down the side, depending what you are making.

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  5. Carolyn Wispe Burns wrote on :

    There are some great how-to videos on You Tube. Once a women who owns a knitting shop in Poulsbo , WA told me to sew the end of the loose ends down with just a few stitches.

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  6. Marne Rogers wrote on :

    I think 3″ is much too little to work with. Whenever possible, leave yourself at least 8″ as debg2 suggested and strive for your ends to be at the edge of the fabric. You didn’t indicate if you are doing flat pieces like scarves or garments or the material you’re working with. Wool is well loved for many reasons and ease of finishing is certainly one reason. Also for consideration is colorwork and stitch pattern. There’s nothing like the help of your LYS for determining the best technique for your specific combination of variables.

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  7. debra geist wrote on :

    I too use a large-eye plastic needle to “sew” the loose end back through my knitting. I usually cut the end at least 8 or more inches and sew back into the garment, then turn and sew back again a few more inches on another row for double insurance. I love to knit dishcloths as gifts, and the ends have stayed secured through their work duties!

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  8. DawnMarie Helin wrote on :

    You’ve gotten pretty good advice so far; keeping a reasonable tail that you can trim later will give you enough to work in your peice until you are comfortable that it has bcome invisable. I have also found that when adding or changing colors, the use of the russian join is much easier to weave in than a tied join.

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  9. Carole Egler wrote on :

    I have used a crochet hook and woven the (3 – 4″) end through the backside of the piece for about an inch or so, and then turned the piece around and weaved it back, making a corner or U-turn to inhibit any unraveling.
    Just be sure to keep it firm without pulling to distort it. How nice to have a project nearly done!

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    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      the u-turn is a great idea! I’ve never tried that….I definitely will now.

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  10. Louise Fadness wrote on :

    I happened to see your response to Geri about leaving 3 inches for weaving. I would make it at least 3 inches, but more would be better. You can always cut off the excess.

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    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      good point! thanks for your advice 🙂

      Reply
  11. Louise Fadness wrote on :

    Although I am an avid needleworker, knitting is not part of my strengths. However, since I love to crochet, I can tell you that when I am finished with a project, I use a crochet hook to weave loose ends into the seams. Perhaps you can try this approach. My mom used a large-eyed needle to do the finish work with loose ends. Perhaps a needlework specialist at the many yarn shops that have sprung up all over would be best able to give you hands’-on help. Good luck!

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  12. Geri Brin wrote on :

    if the ends are too short, they will most likely come out. make sure they’re long enough and weave them through the stitches with a crochet hook.

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    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      thanks, geri! that’s good advice. I guess about 3 inches would be okay? you must be a really good knitter 🙂

      Reply
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