DrupalWomenQ-#7475

I’m in the northeast (zone 6A) and have a pretty robust herb garden, but I have no luck with dill. It’s withered and died the last two years. I keep it in full sun, water in the mornings…any tips?

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10 Answers

  1. linder234 wrote on :

    Most herbs really prefer poor, somewhat dry soil and I suspect you might be giving it too much good stuff. Dill for me also is not a long-lived herb and lasts only part of a summer season. Try watering it only when it seems pretty dry. Mine comes back each year as a reseed but absolutely does not want to be moved to a new spot. I just let it grow where it lands and enjoy it while it lasts.

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    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      thanks for the tips! my dill is a transplant (I didn’t start it from seed) so that may be the problem. I also planted it right before 4 days of non-stop rain and wind. So I’m starting fresh with a new plant and following everyone’s advice. Seems to be doing better already….thanks!

      Reply
  2. rotubre wrote on :

    Dill is a wonderful herb that has many beneficial purposes besides adding to recipes. Dill will grow in most garden soils, however, it has long deep roots so the soil needs to be deeply dug and never compacted. Water only periodically as they can handle some dry spells. They grow tall (3 ft.) so need to be sheltered from strong winds. It is an annual herb for you in zone 6A , but if you allow them to form seed heads they will reseed themselves or you can collect the seeds when they turn brown. Once the seed heads appear the leaf production will stop. Seeds germinate quite easily in the spring, but need to be thinned out and spaced 12″ apart. The leaves can be frozen and will retain their flavor – chop the leaves and place them in ice cube trays filled with water then frozen to be used as needed. Dill is a great companion plant to onions, but does not do well when planted next to carrots or cabbage. I have dill in my butterfly garden, as some butterflies lay their caterpillar eggs on dill for their food source.

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    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      thanks – I started again–a new plant and more loosely packed potting soil. I’m also staying away from the watering can for a few days, especially since it’s been damp in the mornings here. I also paced in a slightly more sheltered spot–away from winds. Thanks again–wish me luck!

      Reply
  3. Joan Ross wrote on :

    Although dill likes full sun, it likes a few hours of it and I usually plant it where it gets partial afternoon shade and also plant it surrounded by other flowers and herbs. Make sure it never dries out either. I love the fern leaf variety and also the mammoth kind.Normally it’s an easy herb to grow

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  4. Shelley Sparks wrote on :

    Did you transplant it or start it from seed? They are sensitive to moving so if you transplanted it, that could be the source of problem for you. Also I’m assuming it is an area protected from wind as it is easily overturned and uprooted in the wind.

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    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      I transplanted it! And I did so right before we have 4 days of awful, non-stop rain and wind. I think that did it in. I’ve started fresh with a new plant and I plan to take it inside if things get too wet or windy. thanks so much for your tip!

      Reply
  5. Debbie Nye wrote on :

    Sorry, I don’t baby my dill, it is a weed. I simply letit be and it does fine. Sorry I couldn’t help you.

    Reply
  6. atb4675 wrote on :

    Perhaps you are giving it too much water as dill has a tap root and does not require a lot. Try backing off the amount of water and see if that helps.

    Reply
    • Lina Perl wrote on :

      helpful! it’s been raining constantly here, too. thanks for the great advice. I will definitely lay off the watering 🙂

      Reply
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