DrupalWomenQ-#9025

taking a trip to Italy in September
What clothing do I need? What is most important?

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7 Answers

  1. AnnettePiper wrote on :

    I was in Italy in September last year and it was HOT, HOT, HOT, every single day and not a drop of rain. I was told however, that is was unseasonably hot. Taking that into account, and the fact that Venice is on the water so a little cooler than inland, for sightseeing I would take some light cotton trousers, light tops and a wrap. For dinner, a dress and pair of wedges with a wrap. I bought some wonderful scarves in little shops in Venice for 5-20 euro but as far as clothing goes- there were only small sizes, you won’t find much over a size 40 or a C cup. Their shoes are wonderful and inexpensive and so are leather goods!! Of course there are many shops in Venice that are expensive so wander around the smallers streets. The roads are mostly stone and most Italian women you see wandering around will look stylish and put together. They will be totally co-ordinated, have the full makeup on and wearing either flat sandals or wedge heels. When I asked a friend who lives just north of Venice why the heels all the time – she explained the stylish Italian woman will almost always wear a heel – but almost all wear wedges rather than heels, as heels get caught in the cobblestones! A good pair of white leather walking sneakers can look quite good with white cotton trousers, so don’t despair of sore feet. The locals will know you are a tourist with your map, puzzled/lost look and entry into museums and historic sites, so do it in comfort. A secure travel bag is important in high traffic tourists areas like Piazza San Marco and the Rialto – you can get a slash-proof one with clipped zippers in some stylish options these days and your passport, money etc. will be safe. Laundromats aren’t easy to find, so lightweight clothing that you can wash yourself in your hotel room is a good idea. Take a portable clothes line! Most importantly take your camera and your smile and ENJOY!

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  2. Annette Brown wrote on :

    As a few people have mentioned, comfortable shoes are THE most important thing. You will be walking a lot on hard surfaces both outside and inside (museums, churches) and not always on flat terrain. As a person who hikes every week, I can tell you a good pair of shoes will be your best friend on a trip like this. I like Merrell with Vibram soles (maybe consider the “Siren Sport” style). Also, it’s a good idea to get yourself in condition and start walking a lot now to build up your stamina. Include stairs or bleachers to practice going up & down — there are a lot of hilly towns and towers to climb in Italy!

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  3. Free-spirit wrote on :

    I’ve lived in Europe three times. Wear dark neutrals and take 3-4 colorful scarves. You want to look chic in your photos! I always pack a skirt and a blazer too. Shoes are your most important issue. Be comfortable but wearing sneakers is a sure sign you’re an American and a target for pickpockets.

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  4. Eddy Robey wrote on :

    The most important thing to have when travelling to Italy is comfortable, thick-soled shoes, which needn’t be sneakers. You will be walking on cobblestones much of the time, and flats or heels will leave you in pain. Florence, for example, is a city where the only women who smile are nuns. Yes, women are wearing gorgeous shoes, but those women are frowning and angry-looking. Italians are impressed by items which look expensive, thus I have been treated magnificently by wearing cole-haan nike-soled loafers, a 100% camel’s hair coat, good hat, gloves, and bag. There is nothing wrong about looking like a tourist, and long as you look like a moneyed tourist.

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  5. Marcia Miller wrote on :

    Got to disagree with BlueBear. I abhor tennis shoes unless you are hiking. The Italian women will be wearing stilettos and boots in the cities. You can find comfortable stylish flats from Mephisto, Ecco, Clarkes, Cole Haan and many other companies. Nothing screams tourist like sneakers. You do not have to sacrifice style to be comfortable. Dressing nicely will get you better treatment and open doors. Trust me on this. I really am a travel guru!

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  6. Cheryl Wilson wrote on :

    A raincoat and an umbrella! There’s a great site called LifeinItaly.com that will tell you the weather in the part of Italy you are planning to visit and it will give you the weather in any month you choose. I have NEVER been to Italy when it didn’t rain and I spent a great deal of time there in every month, except January. Italy is incredibly expensive, particularly right now so, unless you are wealthy, running out and buying a sweater or coat will find you shocked at the prices. Layering will be key to your comfort. A lot of your walking will be on cobblestones, bricks, etc., so flats don’t work unless they have a very thick sole. You’re better off in sneakers where you have some bounce. Italians don’t dress up very much and you can leave your evening clothes at home. Just be yourself! Have a wonder-filled trip and enjoy yourself to the fullest.

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  7. Marcia Miller wrote on :

    Lucky you, that is a beautiful time of the year to experience Italy. You should have great weather which could be warm. First order of business is to shrink down the wardrobe to 1 or 2 basic neutral colors. Find 2 comfortable pairs of shoes and add a pop of color in your tops and accessories and you are good to go. A pashmina is one of my favorite pieces but you can buy tons of pretty ones in Italy so just take one and collect them along the way.
    My company conducts tours all over the world for women only. I am writing a book of travel tips for women. If you would like to call me I would be happy to help you with more personal questions. I have developed a good packing list over the years.
    Try to fit it all in a carry on sized bag. You will thank me later. For now just click yes if this was helpful. Bon voyage!

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